Marco Albarello

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Marco Albarello
Marco Albarello.jpg
Country Italy
Born (1960-05-31) 31 May 1960 (age 60)
Aosta, Italy
Ski clubC.S. Esercito
World Cup career
Seasons19821998
Individual wins2
Team wins2
Indiv. podiums6
Team podiums10
Indiv. starts92
Team starts20
Overall titles0 – (5th in 1993)

Marco Albarello (born 31 May 1960) is an Italian cross-country skier who competed from 1982 to 2002. He was born in Aosta. His best known victory was part of the 4 × 10 km relay team that upset Norway at the 1994 Winter Olympics in Lillehammer. He also won four other medals at the Winter Olympics with three silvers (10 km: 1992; 4 × 10 km relay: 1992, 1998) and one bronze (10 km: 1994).

Biography[edit]

Albarello also won four medals at the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships with one gold (15 km: 1987), two silvers (4 × 10 km relay: 1985, 1993), and one bronze (4 × 10 km relay: 1997).

At the Opening Ceremony for the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin on February 10, he and his 4 × 10 km relay teammates (Maurilio De Zolt, Giorgio Vanzetta, and Silvio Fauner) who won the gold at the 1994 Winter Olympics in Lillehammer, were among the last carriers of the Olympic torch before it was lit by fellow Italian cross-country skier Stefania Belmondo. Albarello was the coach of the Italian national cross-country ski team until May 2007. He's married with Silvana Domaine and he has one son; Jacopo Albarello and one daughter; Giorgia Carlotta Albarello.

World Cup results[edit]

All results are sourced from the International Ski Federation (FIS).[1]

World Cup standings[edit]

 Season   Age  Season standings
Overall Long Distance Sprint
1982 22 NC N/A N/A
1983 23 NC N/A N/A
1984 24 54 N/A N/A
1985 25 49 N/A N/A
1986 26 33 N/A N/A
1987 27 21 N/A N/A
1988 28 26 N/A N/A
1989 29 31 N/A N/A
1990 30 60 N/A N/A
1991 31 9 N/A N/A
1992 32 10 N/A N/A
1993 33 5 N/A N/A
1994 34 14 N/A N/A
1995 35 20 N/A N/A
1996 36 37 N/A N/A
1997 37 35 48 21
1998 38 35 27 38

Individual podiums[edit]

  • 2 victories
  • 6 podiums
No. Season Date Location Race Level Place
1 1986–87 15 February 1987 West Germany Oberstdorf, West Germany 15 km Individual C World Championships[1] 1st
2  1990–91  15 December 1990 Switzerland Davos, Switzerland 15 km Individual C World Cup 2nd
3  1991–92  13 February 1992 France Albertville, France 10 km Individual C Olympic Games[1] 2nd
4 1992–93 9 January 1993 Switzerland Ulrichen, Switzerland 15 km Individual C World Cup 1st
5 19 March 1993 Slovakia Štrbské Pleso, Slovakia 15 km Individual C World Cup 2nd
6  1993–94  17 February 1994 Norway Lillehammer, Norway 10 km Individual C Olympic Games[1] 3rd

Team podiums[edit]

  • 2 victories
  • 10 podiums
No. Season Date Location Race Level Place Teammates
1  1984–85  24 January 1985 Austria Seefeld, Austria 4 × 10 km Relay World Championships[1] 2nd Vanzetta / De Zolt / Ploner
2  1985–86  13 March 1986 Norway Oslo, Norway 4 × 10 km Relay F World Cup 2nd Walder / De Zolt / Vanzetta
3  1986–87  19 March 1987 Norway Oslo, Norway 4 × 10 km Relay C World Cup 3rd De Zolt / Vanzetta / Pulie
4  1987–88  13 March 1988 Sweden Falun, Sweden 4 × 10 km Relay F World Cup 3rd Vanzetta / De Zolt / Barco
5  1991–92  18 February 1992 France Albertville, France 4 × 10 km Relay C/F Olympic Games[1] 2nd Pulie / Vanzetta / Fauner
6  1992–93  26 February 1993 Sweden Falun, Sweden 4 × 10 km Relay C/F World Championships[1] 2nd De Zolt / Vanzetta / Fauner
7 1993–94 22 February 1994 Norway Lillehammer, Norway 4 × 10 km Relay C/F Olympic Games[1] 1st De Zolt / Vanzetta / Fauner
8  1994–95  15 January 1995 Czech Republic Nové Město, Czech Republic 4 × 10 km Relay C World Cup 3rd Maj / Fauner / Godioz
9  1995–96  25 February 1996 Norway Trondheim, Norway 4 × 10 km Relay C/F World Cup 2nd Di Centa / Valbusa / Fauner
10 1 March 1996 Finland Lahti, Finland 4 × 10 km Relay C/F World Cup 1st Fauner / Maj / Valbusa

Note: 1 Until the 1999 World Championships and the 1994 Olympics, World Championship and Olympic races were included in the World Cup scoring system.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Athlete : ALBARELLO Marco". FIS-Ski. International Ski Federation. Retrieved 16 March 2018.

External links[edit]