Mexico City Metro Line 5

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Line 5 / Línea 5
MetroDF Línea 5.svg
Concarril NM-79 en Pantitlán.jpg
Interior view of Pantitlán
Overview
LocaleMexico City
TerminiPolitécnico
Pantitlán
Stations13
Service
TypeRapid transit
SystemMexico City Metro
Operator(s)Sistema de Transporte Colectivo (STC)
Rolling stockMP-68, NM-73AR, MP-82
Ridership237,022 passengers per day (2019)[1]
History
Opened19 December 1981
Technical
Line length14.435 km (9 mi)
Track length15.675 km (10 mi)
Number of tracks2
Track gauge1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in) standard gauge
with roll ways along track
ElectrificationGuide bars
Operating speed36 km/h (22 mph)
Route map

Politécnico
Instituto del Petróleo
Mexico City Metro Line 6
Autobuses del Norte
La Raza
Mexico City Metro Line 3
Misterios
Valle Gómez
Consulado
Mexico City Metro Line 4
Eduardo Molina
Aragón
Oceanía
Mexico City Metro Line B
Terminal Aérea
Mexico City International Airport
Hangares
Pantitlán
Mexico City Metro Line 1 Mexico City Metro Line 9 Mexico City Metro Line A

Mexico City Metro Line 5 is one of the twelve metro lines part of the Mexico City Metro network. Its identifying color is yellow and it runs from the north to the east. The line was inaugurated on 19 December 1981 and it was expanded twice, with the last extension being in 1982 for a total of thirteen stations.[2]

Line 5 also connects with Mexico City International Airport at the Terminal Aérea station.

This line usually had the NM73 trains but due to the introduction of the NM02 trains in Line 2 now it is served by NC-82 Canadian trains made by Bombardier.

In 2019, Line 5 had a total ridership of 86,512,999 passengers, averaging 237,022 passengers per day.[1]

Chronology[edit]

  • 19 December 1981: from Pantitlán to Consulado.
  • 1 July 1982: from Consulado to La Raza.
  • 30 August 1982: from La Raza to Politécnico.

Rolling stock[edit]

Line 5 has had different types of rolling stock throughout the years.

The first MP-68 were made in France in 1968 and refurbished by Bombardier in 1994. The NM-73AR cabin classic trains were made in Mexico by Concarril and Alstom between 1973 and 1978 and refurbished by STC workers between 2003 and 2009; while the cabin CAF were made in Mexico by Concarril, Alstom and CAF between 2000 and 2004 refurbished by CAF between 2003 and 2009. The MP-82 trains were made in Mexico by Concarril between 1983 and 1990.[3]

Station list[edit]

No. Station Date opened Situation Distance (km) Transfers Location
Between
stations
Total
01 Politécnico August 30, 1982 Ground-level, underground access. - 0.0
  • STE logo.jpg TrolleDF.png Trolleybus Line CP
  • CETRAM (Bus platforms) for Tenayuca and Cuautepec
  • Gustavo A. Madero
    02 Instituto del Petróleo August 30, 1982 Ground-level, underground access. 1.3 1.3
  • Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 6
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Mexico City Metrobús Line 6 icon.svg Metrobús Line 6 (at distance)
  • STE logo.jpg TrolleDF.png Zero Emissions Corridor Line A
  • 03 Autobuses del Norte August 30, 1982 Ground-level, underground access. 1.2 2.5
  • North Bus Terminal for Mexico northern cities.
  • STE logo.jpg TrolleDF.png Zero Emissions Corridor Line A
  • 04 La Raza July 1, 1982 Ground-level, underground access. 1.1 3.7
  • Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 3
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Mexico City Metrobús Line 1 icon.svg Metrobús Line 1
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Mexico City Metrobús Line 3 icon.svg Metrobús Line 3
  • STE logo.jpg TrolleDF.png Zero Emissions Corridor Line A
  • CETRAM (Bus platforms) for city north
  • 05 Misterios July 1, 1982 Underground, trench 1.0 4.7
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Mexico City Metrobús Line 7 icon.svg Metrobús Line 7(at distance)
  • Gustavo A. Madero / Cuauhtémoc
    06 Valle Gómez July 1, 1982 Underground, trench 1.2 5.9   Gustavo A. Madero / Venustiano Carranza
    07 Consulado December 19, 1981 Ground-level, underground access. 0.8 6.7
  • Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 4
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Mexico City Metrobús Line 5 icon.svg Metrobús Line 5 (at distance)
  • 08 Eduardo Molina December 19, 1981 Ground-level, underground access. 0.9 7.6
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Mexico City Metrobús Line 5 icon.svg Metrobús Line 5 (at distance)
  • 09 Aragón December 19, 1981 Ground-level, underground access. 1.0 8.6  
    10 Oceanía December 19, 1981 Ground-level, underground access. 1.4 10.0
  • Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line B
  • STE logo.jpg TrolleDF.png Trolleybus Line G
  • Venustiano Carranza
    11 Terminal Aérea December 19, 1981 Underground, trench 1.2 11.3
  • STE logo.jpg TrolleDF.png Trolleybus Line G
  • Mexico City Airport and Inter-terminal AGT (at distance)
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Mexico City Metrobús Line 4 icon.svg Metrobús Line 4 (Airport branch) (at distance)
  • 12 Hangares December 19, 1981 Underground, trench 1.4 12.6  
    13 Pantitlán December 19, 1981 Ground-level, underground access. 1.8 14.4
  • Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 1
  • Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 9
  • Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line A
  • Mexibús Line 3
  • CETRAM (Bus platforms) for Nezahualcoyotl and Chimalhuacán
  • Ridership[edit]

    The following table shows each of Line 6 stations total and average daily ridership during 2019.[1]

    Transfer station
    Terminal
    †‡ Transfer station and terminal
    Rank Station Total ridership Average daily
    1 Pantitlán†‡ 36,594,748 100,260
    2 Politécnico 12,624,212 34,587
    3 Autobuses del Norte 8,280,147 22,685
    4 Terminal Aérea 6,712,062 18,389
    5 La Raza 3,578,110 9,803
    6 Oceanía 3,129,656 8,574
    7 Misterios 2,953,802 8,093
    8 Aragón 2,754,754 7,547
    9 Eduardo Molina 2,486,165 6,811
    10 Instituto del Petróleo 2,215,325 6,069
    11 Consulado 1,799,502 4,930
    12 Hangares 1,772,609 4,856
    13 Valle Gómez 1,611,907 4,416
    Total 86,512,999 237,022

    Tourism[edit]

    Line 5 passes near Mexico City International Airport.

    See also[edit]

    References[edit]

    1. ^ a b c "Afluencia de estación por línea 2019" (in Spanish). Metro CDMX. Retrieved 27 April 2020.
    2. ^ "Línea 5". Metro CDMX. Retrieved 27 April 2020.
    3. ^ "Parque vehicular" (in Spanish). Metro CDMX. Retrieved 27 April 2020.