Mexico City Metro Line 6

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Line 6 / Línea 6
MetroDF Línea 6.svg
La Villa Basilica platforms 01.jpg
Overview
LocaleMexico City
TerminiEl Rosario
Martín Carrera
Stations11
Service
TypeRapid transit
SystemMexico City Metro
Operator(s)Sistema de Transporte Colectivo (STC)
Rolling stockNM-73, NM-79
Ridership136,838 passengers per day (2019)[1]
History
Opened21 December 1983[2]
Technical
Line length11.434 km (7 mi)
Track length13.947 km (9 mi)
Track gauge1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in) standard gauge
with roll ways along track
ElectrificationGuide bars
Route map

El Rosario workshops
El Rosario
Mexico City Metro Line 7
Tezozómoc
UAM-Azcapotzalco
Ferrería/Arena Ciudad de México
Tren Suburbano
Norte 45
Vallejo
Instituto del Petróleo
Mexico City Metro Line 5
Lindavista
Deportivo 18 de Marzo
Mexico City Metro Line 3
La Villa-Basílica
Martín Carerra
Mexico City Metro Line 4

Mexico City Metro Line 6 is one of the twelve metro lines operating in Mexico City, Mexico. Its distinctive color is red. It was the sixth line to be opened.

The line was inaugurated in 1983 and it runs from northwest to northeastern Mexico City. Line 6 has 11 stations and a length of 13.947 km, out of which 11.434 are for service.

Line 6 is the second line in the entire Mexico City Metro network with least passengers, having 49,945,822 users in 2019.[1]

History[edit]

Line 6 was opened on 21 December 1983, in the section that goes from El Rosario, serving the estate Unidad Habitacional El Rosario -the biggest estate in the country, to Instituto del Petróleo. The latter became the first transfer station when it was connected to the already existing station of Line 5.

Three years later, on 8 July 1986, the second stretch of the line was inaugurated: from Instituto del Petróleo to Martín Carrera, connecting with Line 4.

According to the Mexico City Metro Plan published in 2018 by the Sistema de Transporte Colectivo, Line 6 would be expanded from Martín Carrera eastbound towards Villa de Aragón station of Line B. This extension would have a length of 5.69 km and five new stations.[3]

Chronology[edit]

Rolling stock[edit]

Line 6 has had different types of rolling stock throughout the years.

Currently, out of the 390 trains in the Mexico City Metro network, 17 are in service in Line 6.[4]

Station list[edit]

No. Station Date opened Level Distance (km) Transfers Location
Between
stations
Total
01 El Rosario December 21, 1983 Surface - 0.0
  • Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 7
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Mexico City Metrobús Line 6 icon.svg Metrobús Line 6
  • STE logo.jpg TrolleDF.png Trolleybus Line G
  • STE logo.jpg TrolleDF.png Trolleybus Line I
  • CETRAM (Bus platforms) for Tlalnepantla, Naucalpan and Atizapán
  • Azcapotzalco
    02 Tezozómoc December 21, 1983 Underground 1.4 1.4
    03 UAM-Azcapotzalco December 21, 1983 Underground 1.1 2.5
    04 Ferrería/Arena Ciudad de México December 21, 1983 Underground 1.3 3.8
  • Ferrocarril Suburbano.svg FS1.png Suburban Rail Line 1
  • 05 Norte 45 December 21, 1983 Underground 1.2 5.0
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Mexico City Metrobús Line 6 icon.svg Metrobús Line 6
  • 06 Vallejo December 21, 1983 Underground 0.8 5.8
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Mexico City Metrobús Line 6 icon.svg Metrobús Line 6 (at distance)
  • 07 Instituto del Petróleo December 21, 1983 Underground 1.0 6.8
  • Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 5
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Mexico City Metrobús Line 6 icon.svg Metrobús Line 6 (at distance)
  • STE logo.jpg TrolleDF.png Trolleybus Line A
  • Gustavo A. Madero
    08 Lindavista July 8, 1986 Underground 1.4 8.2
    09 Deportivo 18 de Marzo July 8, 1986 Underground 1.2 9.4
  • Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 3
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Mexico City Metrobús Line 1 icon.svg Metrobús Line 1
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Mexico City Metrobús Line 6 icon.svg Metrobús Line 6 (at distance)
  • CETRAM (Bus platforms) for Ecatepec
  • 10 La Villa-Basílica July 8, 1986 Underground 0.7 10.1
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Mexico City Metrobús Line 6 icon.svg Metrobús Line 6 (at distance)
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Mexico City Metrobús Line 7 icon.svg Metrobús Line 7
  • STE logo.jpg TrolleDF.png Trolleybus Line LL
  • 11 Martín Carrera July 8, 1986 Underground 1.3 11.4
  • Mexico City Metro.svg Mexico City Metro Line 4
  • Metrobus Mexico.svg Mexico City Metrobús Line 6 icon.svg Metrobús Line 6
  • STE logo.jpg TrolleDF.png Trolleybus Line LL
  • CETRAM (Bus platforms) for Santa Clara and Ecatepec
  • Renamed stations[edit]

    Date Old name New name
    1996 La Villa La Villa / Basílica
    1998 Basílica Deportivo 18 de Marzo
    2012 Ferrería Ferrería/Arena Ciudad de México

    Ridership[edit]

    The following table shows each of Line 6 stations total and average daily ridership during 2019.[1]

    Transfer station
    †‡ Transfer station and terminal
    Rank Station Total ridership Average daily
    1 Martín Carrera†‡ 11,038,852 30,243
    2 Ferrería/Arena Ciudad de México 8,679,563 23,780
    3 Lindavista 6,525,784 17,879
    4 El Rosario†‡ 5,864,983 16,068
    5 La Villa-Basílica 5,440,130 14,904
    6 UAM-Azcapotzalco 2,947,847 8,076
    7 Vallejo 2,922,747 8,008
    8 Norte 45 2,597,226 7,116
    9 Tezozómoc 2,101,647 5,758
    10 Instituto del Petróleo 1,182,817 3,241
    11 Deportivo 18 de Marzo 644,226 1,765
    Total 49,945,822 136,838

    Tourism[edit]

    Line 6 passes near several places of interest:

    See also[edit]

    References[edit]

    1. ^ a b c "Afluencia de estación por línea 2019" (in Spanish). Metro CDMX. Retrieved 26 April 2020.
    2. ^ "Línea 6" (in Spanish). Metro CDMX.
    3. ^ Sistema de Transporte Colectivo. "Plan Maestro del Metro 2018–2030" (PDF) (in Spanish). p. 49. Retrieved 26 April 2020.
    4. ^ "Parque vehicular" (in Spanish). Metro CDMX. Retrieved 26 April 2020.