Michael Jeffrey Aminoff

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Michael Jeffrey Aminoff

FRCP
Michael Jeffrey Aminoff.jpg
Michael Jeffrey Aminoff, 2013
by RCL Portrait Design
Born1941
NationalityUS
CitizenshipUS
EducationUniversity College London and University College Hospital Medical School, London, UK
OccupationPhysician
Years active53 years
RelativesJanette Dawn Aminoff (nee Williamson), wife.
Children: Alexandra Robyn, Jonathan Charles, Anthony Thomas
Medical career
ProfessionProfessor of Neurology, School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco
FieldNeurology and Neurophysiology
InstitutionsUniversity of California, San Francisco
Sub-specialtiesMovement Disorders specialist; clinical neurophysiologist; medical educator
ResearchElectrophysiological studies of the nervous system
AwardsLifetime Achievement Award, American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine; A.B. Baker Award], American Academy of Neurology

Michael Jeffrey Aminoff (born 1941 in Little Paxton, England) is a clinical neurologist and neurophysiologist whose work currently focuses on treating Parkinson's disease and related movement disorders.[1] He lives in San Francisco, California.

Biography[edit]

Aminoff is a clinical neurologist and neurophysiologist, clinical investigator, university professor, author, and editor with a special interest in medical history. He was born and educated in England, graduating from University College London in 1962 and as a physician from University College Hospital Medical School in 1965. He subsequently trained in neurology and neurophysiology at The National Hospital (Queen Square) in London, and moved to San Francisco in 1976 where he has been Professor of Neurology since 1982 at the School of Medicine of the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF).[2] He was Director of UCSF's Clinical Neurophysiology Laboratories until 2004. Aminoff currently directs UCSF's Parkinson's Disease Clinic and Research Center,[3] a National Parkinson Foundation Center of Excellence.

Aminoff has received numerous honors and awards for his work as an educator and neurologist, including the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine in 2006,[4] and the 2007 A.B. Baker Award of the American Academy of Neurology for lifetime achievements and contributions to medical education.[5] From 2004 to 2012 he was a director of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, serving as chair of the board in 2011[6] and in 2010 UCSF awarded him the title of Distinguished Professor.[7] He is a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of London as well as of the American Academy of Neurology and the American Neurological Association.

He has authored many medical and scientific papers, particularly on electrophysiological studies of the nervous system in health and disease.[8] His scientific published works earned him a Doctorate in Science, an advanced doctorate in the Faculty of Science from the University of London, in 2000. He has written or edited 40 books, including several comprehensive textbooks that have gone into numerous editions.[9] His published works have been translated into 8 languages. He was editor-in-chief of the neuroscience journal Muscle and Nerve from 1998 to 2007,[10] was one of the two editors-in-chief (along with Robert B. Daroff) of the four-volume Encyclopedia of the Neurological Sciences, and is one of three series editors of the multivolume Handbook of Clinical Neurology published by Elsevier.

Aminoff has a longstanding interest in the history of medicine and is the author of biographies of C.E. Brown-Séquard[11] and Sir Charles Bell.[12] With Larry R. Faulkner he edited a volume on the history of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology.[13]

Education and career[edit]

Aminoff received a bachelor of science degree from University College London (1962) and his medical degree (M.B., B.S.) from University College Hospital (UCH) Medical School (London) in 1965. After internship at UCH, he trained in internal medicine at various London teaching hospitals, gained membership of the Royal College of Physicians of London (equivalent to obtaining certification in internal medicine in the U.S.) and then trained in neurology and clinical neurophysiology at the Middlesex Hospital and the National Hospitals for Nervous Diseases (Queen Square and Maida Vale) in London. He received his M.D. degree, which in England is awarded for an advanced research thesis, for his experimental studies at the Institute of Neurology (London) on the spinal integration of various inputs to respiratory motor neurons.[14] He subsequently moved to the University of California San Francisco, where he has held various faculty positions in the department of neurology, becoming a full professor in 1982, and was awarded the title of distinguished professor in 2010.[15] He was certified in neurology by the American Board of Psychiatry & Neurology (ABPN) in 1982 (recertified, 2004) and received subspecialty certification in clinical neurophysiology by the ABPN when this new subspecialty was created in 1992[16] (recertified 2002). In 2000 the University of London awarded him a doctorate in science (a higher doctorate in the faculty of science) for his electrophysiological studies of the nervous system in health and disease.

Research[edit]

Aminoff is a clinical neurologist and neurophysiologist whose original contributions have been in several overlapping areas, utilizing electrophysiological techniques to investigate the functioning of the nervous system in health and disease. His work has been directed at extending the clinical applications of electrodiagnostic techniques or at providing insight into the underlying pathophysiology of various disorders. His work on different aspects of the autonomic nervous system showed involvement of sympathetic fibers in entrapment neuropathies;[17][18] the importance of spinal mechanisms in the control of breathing;[19] the nature and consequences of the dysautonomia occurring in patients with Parkinson’s disease;[20] and the nature of the involuntary motor activity that follows cessation of the cerebral circulation (syncope).[21] His studies of the physiology of sensory discrimination and motor control showed that the discrimination-response system is organized as a parallel network rather than in the serial manner often portrayed,[22] and he provided evidence that the long-latency stretch responses have a transcerebral pathway in humans,[23] are under some degree of voluntary control, and relate to the organization of the discrimination-response system. His studies provided electrophysiological evidence for different types of dementia and defined their electrophysiological characteristics.[24]

Aminoff's clinical studies of spinal vascular malformations (dural arteriovenous fistulas)[25] led to a new theory on their pathophysiology. He and his collaborators suggested that increased venous pressure reduces the intramedullary arteriovenous pressure gradient and thus blood flow, leading to spinal cord ischemia.[26][27][28][29][30] This is now widely accepted and has had major implications for the treatment of these lesions. His later interest in movement disorders led him to show the utility of botulinum toxin in the treatment of various movement disorders,[31][32][33] and then to study gene therapy in managing patients with Parkinson’s disease.[34][35][36]

Aminoff has devoted many years to medical education. As a director and chair of the American Board of Clinical Neurophysiology, of the American Board of Electrodiagnostic Medicine, and of the American Board of Psychiatry & Neurology, he was concerned with syllabus development, setting national guidelines and educational standards, and assessing competence in clinical neurophysiology and clinical neurology. He lectures frequently at regional, national and international meetings, has authored or edited numerous books on neurological science and education, and in 2003 was appointed one of the series editors of the Handbook of Clinical Neurology. His teaching contributions have led to several national awards.

Honors and awards[edit]

1973    Queen Square Prize for Research in Neurology, Institute of Neurology, London, UK
1991    Royer Award (Neurology), University of California, San Francisco
2006    Lifetime Achievement Award, American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine
2007    A.B. Baker Award, American Academy of Neurology
2010    Honorary member, Gold-Headed Cane Society, University of California, San Francisco
2011    Awarded title of “Distinguished Professor” at University of California, San Francisco
2013    Endowed Chair in Parkinson’s Disease Research, University of California, San Francisco

Books[edit]

Aminoff MJ: Spinal Angiomas. Blackwell: Oxford, 1976.

Aminioff MJ: Electromyography in Clinical Practice. Addison Wesley: Reading, Mass., 1978.

Aminoff MJ (Ed): Electrodiagnosis in Clinical Neurology. Churchill Livingstone: New York.
First Edition, 1980; Second Edition, 1986; Third Edition, 1992; Fourth Edition, 1999; Fifth Edition, 2005; Sixth Edition, 2012 (as Aminoff’s Electrodiagnosis in Clinical Neurology)

Consultant in neurology and neurophysiology and Asst. Editor for the Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, Bennington JL (Ed), Saunders: Philadelphia, 1984.

Aminoff MJ (Ed): Electrodiagnosis issue, Neurologic Clinics. Saunders: Philadelphia, 1985
Portuguese (Brazilian) translation published as a separate book, 1987.

Aminoff MJ: Electromyography in Clinical Practice. Electrodiagnostic Aspects of Neuromuscular Disease. 2nd Edition (expanded). Churchill Livingstone: NY, 1987
3rd Edition, Churchill Livingstone: NY, 1998

Simon RP, Aminoff MJ, Greenberg DA: Clinical Neurology. Appleton & Lange: Norwalk, 1989.
Second Edition, 1993; Third edition, 1996; Fourth Edition, 1999; Fifth Edition, 2002; Sixth Edition, 2005; Seventh Edition, 2009; Eighth Edition, 2012; Ninth Edition, 2015; Tenth Edition, 2018

Aminoff MJ (Ed): Neurology and General Medicine. Churchill Livingstone: New York. First Edition, 1989
Second Edition, 1995; Third Edition, 2001; Fourth Edition, 2008; Fifth Edition, 2014 (with Josephson SA; as Aminoff’s Neurology and General Medicine)

Aminoff MJ: Brown-Séquard: A Visionary of Science. Raven Press, New York, 1993.

Goetz CG, Tanner CM, Aminoff MJ (Eds): Handbook of Clinical Neurology, Volume 63: Systemic Disease, Part 1. Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1993.

Tollerud D, Aminoff MJ, et al: "Veterans and Agent Orange," Update 1996. NAP, Washington, 1996;
Update 1998. NAP, Washington, 1998; Herbicide/Dioxin exposure and type 2 diabetes. NAP, Washington, 2000.

Goetz CG, Aminoff MJ (Eds): Handbook of Clinical Neurology, Volume 70: Systemic Diseases, Part II, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1998

Aminoff MJ, Goetz CG (Eds): Handbook of Clinical Neurology, Volume 71: Systemic Diseases, Part III, Elsevier, Amsterdam, 1998

Brown WF, Bolton CF, Aminoff MJ (Eds): Neuromuscular Function and Disease: Basic, Clinical and Electrodiagnostic Aspects. 2 Volumes. Saunders, Philadelphia, 2002

Aminoff MJ, Daroff RB (Eds): Encyclopedia of the Neurological Sciences. 4 Volumes. Academic Press, San Diego, 2003; Second edition, 2014

Aminoff MJ: Brown-Séquard: An Improbable Genius Who Transformed Medicine. Oxford University Press, New York, 2011

Aminoff MJ, Faulkner L (Eds): The American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology: Looking Back and Moving Ahead. American Psychiatric Publishing, Washington, DC, 2012

Jones HR, Burns TM, Aminoff MJ, Pomeroy SL (Eds): The Netter Collection of Medical Illustrations, 2nd Edition. Volume 7: The Nervous System. (In two volumes or parts). Elsevier Saunders, Philadelphia, 2013

Aminoff MJ: Sir Charles Bell: His Life, Art, Neurological Concepts, and Controversial Legacy. Oxford University Press, New York, 2017

Television Appearances[edit]

Parkinson's Disease: A Dose of Hope. Program on Parkinson’s disease for patients and caregivers produced by UCTV and aired nationally for 1 week in 2011. Continues to be available on websites for UCTV,[37] YouTube,[38] and the UCSF PD Center. Parkinson's: Latest from the Experts. Program on Parkinson’s disease for health-care professionals produced by UCTV and aired nationally for 1 week in 2011. Continues to be available on websites for UCTV,[39] YouTube,[40] and the UCSF PD Center.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Michael J Aminoff, UCSF, Distinguished Professor of Neurology; Director, Parkinson's Disease Clinic & Research Center; Executive Vice Chair, Department of Neurology".
  2. ^ "Michael Aminoff, MD, DSc, UCSF Profile".
  3. ^ "Michael J. Aminoff, MD, DSc, FRCP, Director of UCSF Parkinson's Disease Clinic and Research Center".
  4. ^ "American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine, Past Award Recipients".
  5. ^ "A.B. Baker Award For Lifetime Achievement In Neurologic Education, Past Award Recipients".
  6. ^ "American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, Inc., 2011 Annual Report" (PDF).
  7. ^ "UCSF Department of Neurology, Endowed Chairs and Distinguished Professorships".
  8. ^ "Harrison's Neurology in Clinical Medicine, Chapter 6: Electrodiagnostic Studies of Nervous System Disorders: EEG, Evoked Potentials, and EMG; Author: Michael J. Aminoff. Eds: Stephen L. Hauser, S. Andrew Josephson".
  9. ^ "Michael J. Aminoff, Publications".
  10. ^ Aminoff, Michael J (2007). "A decade at the helm of Muscle & Nerve; Editorial: Michael J. Aminoff. Muscle & Nerve 2007". Muscle & Nerve. 36 (6): 731–733. doi:10.1002/mus.20911.
  11. ^ "Michael J. Aminoff: Brown Séquard: An Improbable Genius Who Transformed Medicine, Oxford University Press, 1993".
  12. ^ "Michael J. Aminoff: Sir Charles Bell: His Life, Art, Neurological Concepts, and Controversial Legacy, Oxford University Press, 2016".
  13. ^ "Aminoff, Michael J; Faulkner, Larry R (Eds): The American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology: Looking Back and Moving Ahead. Washington, DC : American Psychiatric Pub., 2012".
  14. ^ Aminoff, M. J; Sears, T. A (1971). "Spinal integration of segmental, cortical and breathing inputs to thoracic respiratory motoneurones". The Journal of Physiology. 215 (2): 557–75. doi:10.1113/jphysiol.1971.sp009485. PMC 1331899. PMID 4336048.
  15. ^ "UCSF Department of Neurology, Endowed Chairs and Distinguished Professorships".
  16. ^ "Subspecialty Certification in Neurophysiology, The American Osteopathic Board of Neurology and Psychiatry".
  17. ^ Aminoff, MJ (1979). "Involvement of peripheral vasomotor fibres in patients with carpal tunnel syndrome". Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry. 42 (7): 649–655. doi:10.1136/jnnp.42.7.649. PMC 490280. PMID 479905.
  18. ^ Aminoff, MJ (1980). "Peripheral sympathetic function in patients with a polyneuropathy". Journal of the Neurological Sciences. 44 (2–3): 213–219. doi:10.1016/0022-510x(80)90128-8. PMID 6243701. S2CID 26882860.
  19. ^ Aminoff MJ, Sears TA: "Spinal integration of segmental, cortical and breathing inputs to thoracic respiratory motoneurons. Journal of Physiology (London) 215:557-573, 1971
  20. ^ Aminoff, MJ; Wilcox, CS (1971). "Assessment of autonomic function in patients with a parkinsonian syndrome". British Medical Journal. 4 (5779): 80–84. doi:10.1136/bmj.4.5779.80. PMC 1799334. PMID 5097425.
  21. ^ Aminoff, MJ; Scheinman, MM; Griffin, JC; Herre, JM (1988). "Electrocerebral accompaniments of syncope associated with malignant ventricular arrhythmias". Annals of Internal Medicine. 108 (6): 791–796. doi:10.7326/0003-4819-108-6-791. PMID 3369769.
  22. ^ Goodin, DS; Aminoff, MJ; Shefrin, SL (1990). "The organization of sensory discrimination and response selection in choice and nonchoice conditions: a study using cerebral evoked potentials in normal humans". Journal of Neurophysiology. 64 (4): 1270–1281. doi:10.1152/jn.1990.64.4.1270. PMID 2258747.
  23. ^ Goodin, DS; Aminoff, MJ; Shih, PY (1990). "Evidence that the long-latency stretch responses of the human wrist extensor muscle involve a transcerebral pathway". Brain. 113 (4): 1075–1091. doi:10.1093/brain/113.4.1075. PMID 2397383.
  24. ^ Goodin, DS; Aminoff, MJ (1986). "Electrophysiological differences between subtypes of dementia". Brain. 109 (6): 1103–1113. doi:10.1093/brain/109.6.1103. PMID 2947660.
  25. ^ "Aminoff MJ, Bernard RO, Logue V, The pathophysiology of spinal vascular malformations". Journal of the Neurological Sciences (23): 255–63. 1974.
  26. ^ Aminoff, MJ; Logue, V (1974). "Clinical features of spinal vascular malformations". Brain. 97 (1): 197–210. doi:10.1093/brain/97.1.197. PMID 4373119.
  27. ^ Aminoff, MJ; Logue, V (1974). "The prognosis of patients with spinal vascular malformations". Brain. 97 (1): 211–218. doi:10.1093/brain/97.1.211. PMID 4434169.
  28. ^ Aminoff, MJ; Barnard, RO; Logue, V (1974). "The pathophysiology of spinal vascular malformations". Journal of the Neurological Sciences. 23 (2): 255–263. doi:10.1016/0022-510x(74)90229-9. PMID 4279276.
  29. ^ Logue, V; Aminoff, MJ; Kendall, BE (1974). "The results of surgical treatment for patients with a spinal angioma". Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry. 37 (9): 1074–1081. doi:10.1136/jnnp.37.9.1074.
  30. ^ Aminoff MJ: Spinal Angiomas. Blackwells: Oxford, 1976
  31. ^ Gelb, DJ; Lowenstein, DH; Aminoff, MJ (1989). "Controlled trial of botulinum toxin injections in the treatment of spasmodic torticollis". Neurology. 39 (1): 80–84. doi:10.1212/wnl.39.1.80. PMID 2642616. S2CID 38221515.
  32. ^ Yoshimura, DM; Aminoff, MJ; Olney, RK (1992). "Botulinum toxin therapy for limb dystonias". Neurology. 42 (3): 627–630. doi:10.1212/wnl.42.3.627. PMID 1549227. S2CID 39232357.
  33. ^ Yoshimura, DM; Aminoff, MJ; Tami, TA; Scott, AB (1992). "Treatment of hemifacial spasm with botulinum toxin". Muscle and Nerve. 15 (9): 1045–1049. doi:10.1002/mus.880150909. PMID 1518513.
  34. ^ Eberling, JL; Jagust, WJ; Christine, CW; Starr, P; Larson, P; Bankiewicz, KS; Aminoff, MJ (2009). "Results from a phase I safety trial of hAADC gene therapy for Parkinson's disease". Neurology. 70 (21): 1980–1983. doi:10.1212/01.wnl.0000312381.29287.ff. PMID 18401019. S2CID 11395121.; Christine CW, Starr PA, Larson PS, Eberling JL, Jagust WJ, Hawkins RA, VanBrocklin HF, Wright JF, Bankiewicz KS, Aminoff MJ (2009). "Safety and tolerability of putaminal AADC gene therapy for Parkinson disease". Neurology. 73 (20): 1662–1669. doi:10.1212/wnl.0b013e3181c29356. PMC 2839805. PMID 19828868.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  35. ^ Forsayeth, J; Bankiewicz, KS; Aminoff, MJ (2010). "Gene therapy for Parkinson's disease: where are we now and where are we going?". Expert Reviews of Neurotherapeutics. 10 (12): 1839–1845. doi:10.1586/ern.10.161. PMID 21091315. S2CID 19113338.
  36. ^ Valles, F; Fiandaca, MS; Eberling, JL; Starr, PA; Larson, PS; Christine, CW; Forsayeth, J; Richardson, RM; Su, X; Aminoff, MJ; Bankiewicz, KS (2010). "Qualitative imaging of adeno-associated virus serotype 2-human aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase gene therapy in a phase I study for the treatment of Parkinson disease". Neurosurgery. 75 (5): 1377–1385. doi:10.1227/NEU.0b013e3181f53a5c. PMID 20871425. S2CID 207147995.
  37. ^ "Parkinson's Disease: A Dose of Hope Produced by UCTV, UCTV Link".
  38. ^ "Parkinson's Disease: A Dose of Hope Produced by UCTV, YouTube Link".
  39. ^ "Parkinson's Disease: Latest From the Experts Produced by UCTV, UCTV Link".
  40. ^ "Parkinson's: Latest From the Experts Produced by UCTV, YouTube Link".

External links[edit]