American Family Field Walk of Fame

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A dark granite plaque inscribed with white text reading, "Kuenn, 32, 1971, 1983" along with the facsimile signature of Harvey Kuenn
A plaque commemorating former Milwaukee Brewers manager and hitting coach Harvey Kuenn on the Walk of Fame

The American Family Field Walk of Fame is an exhibit located at American Family Field in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, that commemorates baseball players, coaches, executives, and broadcasters who have made significant contributions to Major League Baseball (MLB) in Milwaukee. Established by the Milwaukee Brewers MLB team in 2001 with the opening of the stadium, it encompasses the entire history of the Brewers since 1970 and that of the Milwaukee Braves, who played in the city from 1953 to 1965. Twenty individuals have been inducted as of 2020.[1]

Each inductee is honored with a home plate-shaped granite slab featuring their name, uniform number, signature, and years associated with Milwaukee baseball. The slabs are arranged around American Family Field, circling the stadium and culminating with the statues of Hall of Famers Hank Aaron and Robin Yount, former team owner and Commissioner of Baseball Bud Selig, and broadcaster Bob Uecker.[1]

Unlike the Milwaukee Brewers Wall of Honor exhibit at American Family Field, which honors only former Brewers who meet set criteria regarding career milestones or service time,[2] individuals are elected to the Walk of Fame by Wisconsin media members and Brewers executives.[3] Annual ballots include Brewers and Braves who were members of either team for a minimum of three seasons and have been retired for at least three years.[3] Anyone named on 65% or more of all ballots cast is elected.[3] Individuals must receive at least 5% of the vote to remain eligible in future years.[4]

Inductees[edit]

A man in a light baseball uniform and a dark cap with an "M" on the center
Hank Aaron, who was inducted in the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1982, won the 1957 National League MVP Award and was a 15-time All-Star during his Milwaukee Braves career.[5]
A man in a navy baseball uniform with "Brewers" across the chest and a navy cap with an "M" on the center
Robin Yount, who was inducted in the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1999, won two American League MVP Awards (1982 & 1989) and was a 3-time All-Star during his Milwaukee Brewers career.[6]
Key
Position(s) Indicates the inductee's primary position(s) or role(s)
Hall of Famer Member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame
Ford C. Frick Award winner Recipient of the Hall of Fame's Ford C. Frick Award
* Indicates career with the Milwaukee Braves
Walk of Fame inductees
Inducted Name Position(s) Career Ref(s).
2001 Hank AaronHall of Famer Right fielder* / designated hitter 1954–1965,* 1975–1976 [5]
2016 Joe Adcock* First baseman 1953–1962 [7]
2010 Lew Burdette* Pitcher 1953–1963 [8]
2002 Cecil Cooper First baseman 1977–1987 [9]
2003 Harry Dalton General manager 1977–1991 [10]
2001 Rollie FingersHall of Famer Pitcher 1981–1982, 1984–1985 [11]
2004 Jim Gantner Second baseman 1976–1992 [12]
2015 Teddy Higuera Pitcher 1985–1991, 1993–1994 [13]
2018 Geoff Jenkins Outfielder 1998–2007 [14]
2005 Harvey Kuenn Hitting coach / manager 1971–1983 [15]
2013 Johnny Logan* Shortstop 1953–1961 [16]
2007 Eddie Mathews*Hall of Famer Third baseman 1953–1965 [17]
2001 Paul MolitorHall of Famer Third baseman 1978–1992 [18]
2005 Don Money Third baseman 1973–1983 [19]
2007 John Quinn* General manager 1953–1959 [20]
2002 Bud SeligHall of Famer Owner 1970–1998 [21]
2007 Warren Spahn*Hall of Famer Pitcher 1953–1964 [22]
2004 Gorman Thomas Outfielder 1973–1976, 1978–1983, 1986 [23]
2003 Bob UeckerFord C. Frick Award winner Catcher* / broadcaster 1962–1963,* 1971–present [24][25]
2001 Robin YountHall of Famer Shortstop 1974–1993 [6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Walk of Fame". Milwaukee Brewers. Major League Baseball. Retrieved December 18, 2020.
  2. ^ "Wall of Honor". Milwaukee Brewers. Major League Baseball. Retrieved December 18, 2020.
  3. ^ a b c "Brewers Announce Wall of Honor and Walk of Fame Inductees". Milwaukee Brewers. Major League Baseball. February 22, 2018. Retrieved December 20, 2020.
  4. ^ "Teddy Higuera to Be Inducted into Miller Park Walk of Fame". Milwaukee Brewers. Major League Baseball. February 2, 2015. Retrieved December 20, 2020.
  5. ^ a b "Hank Aaron Stats". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved December 17, 2020.
  6. ^ a b "Robin Yount Stats". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved December 16, 2020.
  7. ^ "Joe Adcock Stats". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved December 20, 2020.
  8. ^ "Lew Burdette Stats". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved December 20, 2020.
  9. ^ "Cecil Cooper Stats". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved December 16, 2020.
  10. ^ "Brewers General Managers". Milwaukee Brewers. Major League Baseball. Retrieved December 9, 2020.
  11. ^ "Rollie Fingers Stats". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved December 16, 2020.
  12. ^ "Jim Gantner Stats". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved December 20, 2020.
  13. ^ "Teddy Higuera Stats". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved December 20, 2020.
  14. ^ "Geoff Jenkins Stats". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved December 20, 2020.
  15. ^ "Gorman Thomas Stats". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved December 20, 2020.
  16. ^ "Johnny Logan Stats". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved December 20, 2020.
  17. ^ "Eddie Mathews Stats". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved December 20, 2020.
  18. ^ "Paul Molitor Stats". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved December 16, 2020.
  19. ^ "Don Money Stats". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved December 20, 2020.
  20. ^ Costello, Rory. "John J. Quinn". Society for American Baseball Research. Retrieved December 20, 2020.
  21. ^ "Bud Selig". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved December 17, 2020.
  22. ^ "Warren Spahn Stats". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved December 20, 2020.
  23. ^ "Gorman Thomas Stats". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved December 20, 2020.
  24. ^ "Bob Uecker Stats". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved December 20, 2020.
  25. ^ "2003 Ford C. Frick Award Winner Bob Uecker". National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved December 18, 2020.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 43°01′45″N 87°58′21″W / 43.02917°N 87.97250°W / 43.02917; -87.97250