Minister of Transport and Communications (Norway)

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Minister of Transport and Communications of Norway
Samferdselsministeren
Statsikon.svg
Knut Arild Hareide (KrF).JPG
Incumbent
Knut Arild Hareide

since 24 January 2020
Ministry of Transport and Communications
Member ofCouncil of State
SeatOslo
NominatorPrime Minister
AppointerMonarch
with approval of Parliament
Term lengthNo fixed length
Constituting instrumentConstitution of Norway
PrecursorMinister of the Interior
Formation22 February 1946
First holderNils Langhelle
DeputyState secretaries at the Ministry of Transport and Communications
WebsiteOfficial website

The Minister of Transport and Communications (Norwegian: Samferdelsministeren)[1] is a Councillor of State and Chief of the Norwegian Ministry of Transport and Communications. The post has been held by Knut Arild Hareide of the Christian Democrats since 2020.[2] The ministry is responsible for policy and public operations within postal services, telecommunications, civil aviation, public roads, rail transport and public transport, including ferry services that are part of national roads and coastal transport infrastructure.[3] The ministry has seven agencies and four limited companies, including the airport operator Avinor, the Norwegian National Rail Administration, the Norwegian State Railways, the Norwegian Public Roads Administration and Norway Post. There are also inspectorates and authorities related to accident investigation, civil aviation, post and telecommunications, and railways.[4][5]

The position was created with the ministry on 22 February 1946, when Nils Langhelle (Labour) was appointed.[6] The ministry and minister position were split out from the Ministry of Labour.[7] Twenty-eight people have held the position, representing six parties. Sixteen people have represented the Labour Party, five the Centre Party, two each the Christian Democratic Party, the Conservative Party and the Liberal Party and one for the Progress Party. The longest-sitting minister is Kjell Opseth (Labour) who sat a week short of six years.[8] Lars Leiro (Centre) sat for only four weeks, giving him the shortest tenure.[9] He both succeeded and preceded Trygve Bratteli,[10][11] the only person to have held the position twice and the only officeholder to later become Prime Minister.[12]

Key[edit]

The following lists the minister, their party, date of assuming and leaving office, their tenure in years and days, and the cabinet they served in.

  Labour Party
  Centre Party
  Conservative Party
  Christian Democratic Party
  Liberal Party
  Progress Party

Ministers[edit]

Photo Name Party Took office Left office Tenure Cabinet Ref
27540 Nils Langhelle.jpg Nils Langhelle Labour 22 February 1946 5 January 1952 5 years, 317 days Gerhardsen II
Torp
[6][13]
Jakob Martin Pettersen Labour 5 January 1952 22 January 1955 3 years, 17 days Torp [13]
Kolbjørn Varmann Labour 22 January 1955 23 April 1960 5 years, 92 days Gerhardsen III [10]
Trygve Bratteli (5Fo30141709010076).jpg Trygve Bratteli Labour 23 April 1960 28 August 1963 3 years, 127 days Gerhardsen III [10]
Lars Leiro Centre 28 August 1963 25 September 1963 28 days Lyng [9]
Trygve Bratteli (5Fo30141709010076).jpg Trygve Bratteli Labour 25 September 1963 20 January 1964 117 days Gerhardsen IV [11]
Erik Himle.jpg Erik Himle Labour 20 January 1964 12 October 1965 1 year, 265 days Gerhardsen IV [11]
8684 Håkon Kyllingmark.jpg Håkon Kyllingmark Conservative 12 October 1965 17 March 1971 5 years, 156 days Borten [14]
Steen Reiulf 2007.jpg Reiulf Steen Labour 17 March 1971 18 October 1972 1 year, 215 days Bratteli I [12]
John Austrheim Centre 18 October 1972 16 October 1973 363 days Korvald [15]
Annemarie Lorentzen Labour 16 October 1973 15 January 1976 2 years, 91 days Bratteli II [16]
Ragnar Christiansen Labour 15 January 1976 11 January 1978 1 year, 361 days Nordli [17]
Asbjørn Jordahl Labour 11 January 1978 8 October 1979 1 year, 270 days Nordli [17]
Ronald Bye Labour 8 October 1979 14 October 1981 2 years, 6 days Nordli
Brundtland I
[17][18]
Inger Koppernæs Conservative 14 October 1981 8 June 1983 1 year, 237 days Willoch I [19]
Johan J. Jakobsen, fotografert under Sps landsmøte i Haugesund i 2015 (cropped).jpg Johan J. Jakobsen Centre 8 June 1983 9 May 1986 2 years, 335 days Willoch II [19]
Kjell Borgen Labour 9 May 1986 13 June 1988 2 years, 35 days Brundtland II [20]
William Engseth.jpg William Engseth Labour 13 June 1988 16 October 1989 1 year, 125 days Brundtland II [20]
Lars Gunnar Lie Christian Democratic 16 October 1989 3 November 1990 1 year, 18 days Syse [21]
Kjell Opseth 2007 04 19.jpg Kjell Opseth Labour 3 November 1990 25 October 1996 5 years, 357 days Brundtland III [8]
Sissel Rønbeck Labour 25 October 1996 17 October 1997 357 days Jagland [22]
Odd Einar Dørum (bilde 01).jpg Odd Einar Dørum Liberal 17 October 1997 15 March 1999 1 year, 149 days Bondevik I [23]
Dag Jostein Fjærvoll Christian Democratic 15 March 1999 17 March 2000 1 year, 2 days Bondevik I [23]
Terje Moe Gustavsen 01.jpg Terje Moe Gustavsen Labour 17 March 2000 19 October 2001 1 year, 216 days Stoltenberg I [24]
Torild Skogsholm.jpg Torild Skogsholm Liberal 19 October 2001 17 October 2005 3 years, 363 days Bondevik II [25]
Liv Signe Navarsete (Senterpartiet).jpg Liv Signe Navarsete Centre 17 October 2005 20 October 2009 4 years, 3 days Stoltenberg II [26]
11Rogaland, Magnhild Meltveit Kleppa.jpg Magnhild Meltveit Kleppa Centre 20 October 2009 18 June 2012 2 years, 242 days Stoltenberg II [26]
Marit Arnstad.jpg Marit Arnstad Centre 18 June 2012 16 October 2013 1 year, 120 days Stoltenberg II [26]
Ketil solvik olsen.jpg Ketil Solvik-Olsen Progress 16 October 2013 31 August 2018 4 years, 319 days Solberg [2]
Jon Georg Dale.jpg Jon Georg Dale Progress 31 August 2018 24 January 2020 1 year, 146 days Solberg [27]
Knut Arild Hareide (KrF).JPG Knut Arild Hareide Christian Democratic 24 January 2020 present 63 days Solberg [28]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Samferdselsminister Magnhild Meltveit Kleppa". Government.no. Archived from the original on 23 March 2012. Retrieved 23 March 2012.
  2. ^ a b "Erna Solberg's Government". Government.no. 16 October 2013. Retrieved 23 October 2013.
  3. ^ "About the ministry". Government.no. Archived from the original on 23 March 2012. Retrieved 23 March 2012.
  4. ^ "Subordinate agencies and enterprises". Government.no. Retrieved 22 May 2010.
  5. ^ "Subordinate enterprises". Government.no. Archived from the original on 23 March 2012. Retrieved 23 March 2012.
  6. ^ a b "Einar Gerhardsen's Second Government". Government.no. Archived from the original on 23 March 2012. Retrieved 23 March 2012.
  7. ^ "Norwegian Government Ministries since 1945". Government.no. Archived from the original on 23 March 2012. Retrieved 23 March 2012.
  8. ^ a b "Gro Harlem Brundtland's Third Government". Government.no. Archived from the original on 23 March 2012. Retrieved 23 March 2012.
  9. ^ a b "John Lyng's Government". Government.no. Archived from the original on 23 March 2012. Retrieved 23 March 2012.
  10. ^ a b c "Einar Gerhardsen's Third Government". Government.no. Archived from the original on 23 March 2012. Retrieved 23 March 2012.
  11. ^ a b c "Einar Gerhardsen's Fourth Government". Government.no. Archived from the original on 23 March 2012. Retrieved 23 March 2012.
  12. ^ a b "Trygve Bratteli's First Government". Government.no. Archived from the original on 23 March 2012. Retrieved 23 March 2012.
  13. ^ a b "Oscar Torp's Government". Government.no. Archived from the original on 23 March 2012. Retrieved 23 March 2012.
  14. ^ "Per Borten's Government". Government.no. Archived from the original on 23 March 2012. Retrieved 23 March 2012.
  15. ^ "Lars Korvald's Government". Government.no. Archived from the original on 23 March 2012. Retrieved 23 March 2012.
  16. ^ "Trygve Bratteli's Second Government". Government.no. Archived from the original on 23 March 2012. Retrieved 23 March 2012.
  17. ^ a b c "Odvar Nordli's Government". Government.no. Archived from the original on 23 March 2012. Retrieved 23 March 2012.
  18. ^ "Gro Harlem Brundtland's First Government". Government.no. Archived from the original on 23 March 2012. Retrieved 23 March 2012.
  19. ^ a b "Odvar Nordli's Government". Government.no. Archived from the original on 23 March 2012. Retrieved 23 March 2012.
  20. ^ a b "Gro Harlem Brundtland's Second Government". Government.no. Archived from the original on 23 March 2012. Retrieved 23 March 2012.
  21. ^ "Jan Syse's Government". Government.no. Archived from the original on 23 March 2012. Retrieved 23 March 2012.
  22. ^ "Thorbjørn Jagland's Government". Government.no. Archived from the original on 23 March 2012. Retrieved 23 March 2012.
  23. ^ a b "Kjell Magne Bondevik's First Government". Government.no. Archived from the original on 23 March 2012. Retrieved 23 March 2012.
  24. ^ "Jens Stoltenberg's First Government". Government.no. Archived from the original on 23 March 2012. Retrieved 23 March 2012.
  25. ^ "Kjell Magne Bondevik's Second Government". Government.no. Archived from the original on 23 March 2012. Retrieved 23 March 2012.
  26. ^ a b c "Jens Stoltenberg's Second Government". Government.no. Archived from the original on 23 March 2012. Retrieved 23 March 2012.
  27. ^ "Solvik-Olsen Out of Government - Dale Becomes New Minister of Transport". Dagbladet. 30 August 2018. Retrieved 30 August 2018.
  28. ^ "This Is Solberg's Cabinet 4.0". NRK. 24 January 2020. Retrieved 24 January 2020.