Monalazone

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Monalazone
Monalazone.svg
Clinical data
Trade namesNaclobenz-Natrium, Spergisin, Speton
Other namesp-(Chlorosulfamoyl)benzoic acid
Routes of
administration
Vaginal
Drug classDisinfectant
ATC code
  • None
Identifiers
  • 4-(chlorosulfamoyl)benzoic acid
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
ChEMBL
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC7H6ClNO4S
Molar mass235.64 g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
  • C1=CC(=CC=C1C(=O)O)S(=O)(=O)NCl
  • InChI=1S/C7H6ClNO4S/c8-9-14(12,13)6-3-1-5(2-4-6)7(10)11/h1-4,9H,(H,10,11)
  • Key:WGHSWNHOFPGMKJ-UHFFFAOYSA-N

Monalazone, used as monalazone disodium (INN; the disodium salt) and sold under the brand names Naclobenz-Natrium, Spergisin, and Speton, is a vaginal disinfectant or antiseptic and spermicidal contraceptive.[1][2][3][4] It is a sulfonylbenzoic acid derivative and is closely related structurally to halazone.[2] The compound was synthesized in 1937.[1] A vaginal tablet combination of 0.125 mg estradiol benzoate and 10 mg monalazone was previously marketed under the brand name Malun 25.[5][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Elks J (14 November 2014). The Dictionary of Drugs: Chemical Data: Chemical Data, Structures and Bibliographies. Springer. pp. 834–. ISBN 978-1-4757-2085-3.
  2. ^ a b Morton IK, Hall JM (31 October 1999). Concise Dictionary of Pharmacological Agents: Properties and Synonyms. Springer Science & Business Media. pp. 185–. ISBN 978-0-7514-0499-9.
  3. ^ a b Martindale W, Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain. Dept. of Pharmaceutical Sciences (1993). The Extra Pharmacopoeia. Pharmaceutical Press. p. 800. ISBN 978-0-85369-300-0. Monalazone disodium is an antiseptic closely related structurally to halazone (see p.796) and is used as a vaginal disinfectant and spermicide. Proprietary Names Malun N. Sperlisin. Multi-ingredient preparations. Malun.
  4. ^ RÖMPP Lexikon Chemie. 10. Auflage, 1996–1999. Thieme. 16 July 2014. pp. 2000–2001. ISBN 978-3-13-200031-5.
  5. ^ Leidenberger FA (17 April 2013). Klinische Endokrinologie für Frauenärzte. Springer-Verlag. pp. 527–. ISBN 978-3-662-08110-5.