Novi Grad, Bosnia and Herzegovina

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Novi Grad, Republika Srpska)
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Novi Grad

Нови Град
Novi Grad
Novi Grad
Location of Novi Grad within Republika Srpska
Location of Novi Grad within Republika Srpska
Novi Grad-naselja.PNG
Coordinates: 45°02′53″N 16°22′37″E / 45.048°N 16.377°E / 45.048; 16.377Coordinates: 45°02′53″N 16°22′37″E / 45.048°N 16.377°E / 45.048; 16.377
Country Bosnia and Herzegovina
EntityRepublika Srpska
 • Municipality472.72 km2 (182.52 sq mi)
Population
 (2013 census)
 • Town
11,063
 • Municipality
27,115
 • Municipality density57/km2 (150/sq mi)
Websitewww.opstina-novigrad.com
Library Novi Grad
City Hall Novi Grad
River Una Novi Grad

Novi Grad (Serbian Cyrillic: Нови Град), is a town and municipality in Republika Srpska, an entity of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Situated in the far northwest of the country, it lies across the Una from the Croatian town of Dvor. According to the 2013 census, the town has a population of 11,063 while its municipality comprises a total of 27,115 inhabitants.

Known for its scenic quay, Novi Grad lies at the confluence of the Una and Sana rivers.

Geography[edit]

Novi Grad is located on the right bank of the Una and both banks of the Sana, between two geographic zones: the slopes of the mountains of Grmeč and Kozara, and the alluvial land surrounding the town's two rivers. The town itself is located 122 m (400 feet) above sea level, at nearly 45°N; the climate is temperate-continental. Its governed municipality covers an area of 470 km2 (180 sq mi).

History[edit]

The town was first mentioned in 1280 under the Latin name Castrum Novum which, literally translated, means 'new fort'. It belonged to the dukes of Blagaj and in the early sixteenth century came under power of Nikola Zrinski. Croatian ban Adam Bačan conquered Novi in 1693.[1] Evliya Çelebi on his journey through Bosnia mentions that Croatian nobles built Novi Grad. [2] In 1895, during Austro-Hungarian rule in Bosnia and Herzegovina, the town was officially given the name 'Bosanski Novi'. At the same time, the city included around 3,300 people with 550 households. Wooden bridges existed across the Una and Sana rivers which the citizens had to guard against floods in the autumn and spring. For that reason, a current-day symbol of the town was built in 1906—the Una quay.

In 1872, Novi Grad was the first municipality to have a train station on the new Bosnian railway, which afforded it significant cultural and economic advantages over other Krajina[3] municipalities. The first hospital was established around the same time.

From 1929 to 1941, Novi Grad was part of the Vrbas Banovina of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia.

From 1992 through 1995, the town was ethnically cleansed of its Bosniak and Croat inhabitants, thereby rendering it almost completely Serb-populated. In order to distance the town from its Bosnian history and its cultural roots and in tune with the war politics, the local Serb government renamed the town to Novi Grad, a change criticized by Croat and Bosniak residents. Consequently, majority of people from Bosanski Novi were misplaced and live all over Europe, the American continent, Australia and elsewhere around the globe.

After the Bosnian war, Kostajnica was split from the municipality.

Settlements[edit]

Aside from the town of Novi Grad, the municipality includes the following settlements:

Demographics[edit]

Autumn in Novi Grad
Novi Grad by population proportional to the settlement with the highest and lowest population

Population[edit]

Population of settlements – Novi Grad municipality
1948. 1953. 1961. 1971. 1981. 1991. 2013.
Total 41,216 42,142 41,665 27,115
1 Ahmetovci
2 Blagaj Japra 1,279 807
3 Blagaj Rijeka 980 488
4 Blatna 443 367
5 Cerovica
6 Crna Rijeka
7 Čađavica Donja 408 338
8 Čađavica Gornja 297 240
9 Čađavica Srednja 262 192
10 Ćele
11 Devetaci
12 Dobrljin 1,141 858
13 Donje Vodičevo 801 615
14 Donji Agići 935 637
15 Donji Rakani 315 338
16 Gornje Vodičevo 368 278
17 Gornji Agići 540 244
18 Gornji Rakani 254 249
19 Grabašnica
20 Hozići 958 610
21 Johovica
22 Jošava
23 Kršlje 632 434
24 Kuljani
25 Lješljani
26 Mala Krupska Rujiška 431 384
27 Mala Novska Rujiška 573 412
28 Mala Žuljevica
29 Maslovare 500 284
30 Matavazi 563 466
31 Mazić
32 Novi Grad 4,070 4,884 7,023 9,849 12,186 13,588 11,063
33 Petkovac 227 205
34 Poljavnice 1,137 1,266
35 Prusci
36 Radomirovac 557 419
37 Rakovac
38 Rašće
39 Ravnice 639 581
40 Rudice 452 590
41 Sokolište 611 410
42 Suhača 1,087 506
43 Svodna 1,270 1,038
44 Trgovište 377 274
45 Vedovica
46 Velika Rujiška
47 Velika Žuljevica 410 224
48 Vitasovci 385 399

Ethnic composition[edit]

Ethnic composition – Novi Grad town
2013. 1991. 1981. 1971.
Total 11,063 (100,0%) 13,588 (100,0%) 12,186 (100,0%) 9,849 (100,0%)
Bosniaks 6,831 (50,27%) 5,211 (42,76%) 5,520 (56,05%)
Serbs 5,121 (37,69%) 3,900 (32,00%) 3,610 (36,65%)
Yugoslavs 1,117 (8,220%) 2,647 (21,72%) 308 (3,127%)
Others 332 (2,443%) 42 (0,345%) 74 (0,751%)
Croats 187 (1,376%) 217 (1,781%) 287 (2,914%)
Albanians 77 (0,632%) 20 (0,203%)
Roma 66 (0,542%)
Montenegrins 16 (0,131%) 18 (0,183%)
Slovenes 8 (0,066%) 11 (0,112%)
Macedonians 1 (0,008%)
Hungarians 1 (0,008%) 1 (0,010%)
Ethnic composition
2013. 1991. 1981. 1971.
Total 27,115 (100,0%) 41,665 (100,0%) 42,142 (100,0%) 41,216 (100,0%)
Serbs 20,116 (74,19%) 25,101 (60,24%) 25,098 (59,56%) 28,328 (68,73%)
Bosniaks 6,439 (23,75%) 14,040 (33,70%) 11,745 (27,87%) 1, 625 (28,21%)
Others 379 (1,398%) 564 (1,354%) 116 (0,275%) 173 (0,420%)
Croats 181 (0,668%) 403 (0,967%) 458 (1,087%) 640 (1,553%)
Yugoslavs 1 557 (3,737%) 4 525 (10,74%) 366 (0,888%)
Albanians 85 (0,202%) 26 (0,063%)
Roma 72 (0,171%)
Montenegrins 24 (0,057%) 32 (0,078%)
Slovenes 10 (0,024%) 19 (0,046%)
Hungarians 6 (0,014%) 5 (0,012%)
Macedonians 3 (0,007%) 2 (0,005%)

Economy[edit]

The economy is based on a few industries and a number of private firms. Novi Grad has notable potential in tourism, wood processing, food production and management of water resources.

The following table gives a preview of total number of registered people employed in legal entities per their core activity (as of 2018):[4]

Activity Total
Agriculture, forestry and fishing 92
Mining and quarrying 47
Manufacturing 722
Electricity, gas, steam and air conditioning supply 103
Water supply; sewerage, waste management and remediation activities 91
Construction 30
Wholesale and retail trade, repair of motor vehicles and motorcycles 1,038
Transportation and storage 438
Accommodation and food services 243
Information and communication 28
Financial and insurance activities 47
Real estate activities 4
Professional, scientific and technical activities 96
Administrative and support service activities 10
Public administration and defense; compulsory social security 304
Education 424
Human health and social work activities 187
Arts, entertainment and recreation 22
Other service activities 72
Total 3,998

Sport[edit]

There are several active sports organizations in the town, including football, handball and basketball clubs.

The local football club is FK Sloboda Novi Grad.

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ HAMDIJA KREŠEVLJAKOVIĆ STARI BOSANSKI GRADOVI (VIEUX BOURGS BOSNIAQUES) https://www.fmks.gov.ba/download/zzs/1953/1-1953.pdf
    1. page=36
  2. ^ Hazim Šabanović, Putopis : odlomci o jugoslavenskim zemljama, 1967, https://www.academia.edu/6486045/Evlija_Celebi_Putopis #page=219
  3. ^ Krajina, official name of region Archived 2015-06-07 at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ "Cities and Municipalities of Republika Srpska" (PDF). rzs.rs.ba. Republika Srspka Institute of Statistics. 25 December 2019. Retrieved 31 December 2019.

References[edit]

External links[edit]