Odyssey Sims

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Odyssey Sims
Odyssey Sims 20190714 Lorie Shaull.jpg
Sims in 2019
No. 1 – Minnesota Lynx
PositionPoint guard / Shooting guard
LeagueWNBA
Personal information
Born (1992-07-13) July 13, 1992 (age 27)
Irving, Texas
NationalityAmerican
Listed height5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)
Listed weight160 lb (73 kg)
Career information
High schoolMacArthur (Irving, Texas)
CollegeBaylor (2010–2014)
WNBA draft2014 / Round: 1 / Pick: 2nd overall
Selected by the Tulsa Shock
Playing career2014–present
Career history
20142016Tulsa Shock / Dallas Wings
2014–2015Bucheon KEB-Hana Bank
2015–2016AGÜ Spor
2016–2017Botaş SK
20172018Los Angeles Sparks
2017–2018Adana ASKİ SK
2018–2019Kayseri Basketbol
2019–presentMinnesota Lynx
Career highlights and awards
Stats at WNBA.com

Odyssey Celeste Sims (born July 13, 1992) is an American professional basketball player for the Minnesota Lynx of the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA). An AP and WBCA All-American,[1][2] Sims was born in Irving, Texas and graduated from MacArthur High School.[3]

High school[edit]

Sims in 2010

Sims was a 2010 graduate of MacArthur High School in Irving, Texas. She was rated the number one point guard in the class of 2010, earned the WBCA/State Farm National High School Player of the Year award and had her jersey retired.[4]

College career[edit]

Sims attended Baylor University for four seasons. As a freshman, Sims was Named National Freshman of the Year, was named Big 12 Freshman of the Year and also to the All-Big 12 first team. In her sophomore season, Sims earned team Co-MVP honors with teammate Brittney Griner. Scored in double digits in 30 of 40 games and won a NCAA Championship after Baylor defeated Notre Dame. In her junior year, Sims was earned Co-MVP honors for the second straight year with Griner. In Big 12 statistics, she was ranked number 1 in assist/turnover ratio (2.7), number 3 in steals (2.8), number 4 in assists (5.8), and number 5 in free throw percentage (.832). In her senior year, Sims would statistically have the best season of her college career. She scored a career-high 48 points along with 10 rebounds in a 78–62 victory against West Virginia.[5] She finished the season averaging 28.5 points per game.[4]

Baylor statistics[edit]

Source[6]

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high
Year Team GP Points FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
2010-11 Baylor 36 471 47.5 45.3 75.7 3.0 3.1 1.4 0.0 13.1
2011-12 Baylor 40 594 44.7 39.9 83.0 3.0 4.4 3.0 0.1 14.9
2012-13 Baylor 32 414 47.7 33.7 83.2 2.5 5.8 2.8 0.1 12.9
2013-14 Baylor 37 1054 44.6 39.8 80.8 4.6 4.6 2.0 0.1 28.5
Career Baylor 145 2533 45.7 40.3 81.0 3.3 4.4 2.3 0.1 17.5

Professional career[edit]

WNBA[edit]

Two women straining up at a jump ball
Sims and Maya Moore jump for the ball during game 5 of the 2017 WNBA Finals

Sims was drafted 2nd overall by the Tulsa Shock in the 2014 WNBA draft. In her rookie season, Sims immediately entered the starting line-up for the Shock at the shooting guard position. Sims would instantly become a scoring sensation in the league; she scored a career-high 39 points in a 95–93 loss to the San Antonio Stars.[7] She finished her rookie season, averaging a career-high 16.7 points per game along with a career-high 4.2 assists per game in 34 games with 31 starts and was named to the WNBA All-Rookie Team. The Shock finished fifth place in the Western Conference with a 12–22 record, missing out on the playoffs.

Woman looking over her shoulder at the camera
Sims during the 2017 WNBA Finals

In 2015, Sims would have an injury-riddled season, she missed 10 games with a knee injury. She finished the season, with 23 games played along with 19 starts and averaged 16.0 points per game and 3.8 assists per game. The Shock would make the playoffs with the number 3 seed in the Western Conference, posting an 18–16 record, but were eliminated in a 2-game sweep by the Phoenix Mercury in the first round.

In 2016, the Tulsa Shock relocated to Dallas, Texas (which is approximately 15 miles away from Sims's hometown of Irving, Texas) and were renamed the Dallas Wings. In the 2016 season, Sims would be healthy; she played in 34 games with 30 starts and averaged 14.0 points per game along with 3.9 assists per game at shooting guard.[8] The Wings missed out on playoff contention with an 11–23 record.

In 2017, Sims was traded to the Los Angeles Sparks along with the number 11 overall pick in the 2017 WNBA Draft in exchange for two first round picks in the 2017 WNBA Draft.[9] She initially came off the bench, but would be inserted into the starting lineup at the shooting guard spot after Essence Carson suffered an right elbow sprain. On August 24, 2017, Sims scored a season-high 28 points along with 8 assists and 6 rebounds as a starter in an 82–67 victory over the Phoenix Mercury.[10] The Sparks would finish with a 26–8 record as the number 2 seed in the league with a double-bye to the semi-finals, following last season's new playoff format. Heading into the playoffs, Sims remained the starting shooting guard for the Sparks. The Sparks would go on to advance to the Finals after defeating the Mercury in a 3-game sweep of the semi-finals. Sims tied her playoff career-high of 22 points in Game 3 with the Sparks winning 89–87 to clinch their second consecutive berth to the Finals. However, the Sparks would lose in the Finals to the Minnesota Lynx in five games.

Waist high portrait of young woman holding up a basketball wearing very long braids reaching her waist and a yellow basketball uniform
Sims in 2018

In February 2018, Sims re-signed with the Sparks in free agency.[11] On May 20, 2018, in the Sparks' season opener, Sims scored a season-high 21 points in a 77–76 victory over the Minnesota Lynx.[12] As the season went on, Sims would struggle and eventually would lose her starting position going into the playoffs. The Sparks finished as the number 6 seed in the league with a 19–15 record. In the first round elimination game, the Sparks defeated the Minnesota Lynx 75–68 to advance. In the second round elimination game, the Sparks would lose 96–64 to the Washington Mystics.

In 2019, Sims again re-signed with the Sparks after they matched an offer sheet made by the Phoenix Mercury.[13] On April 22, 2019, Sims was traded to the Minnesota Lynx in exchange for Alexis Jones.[14]

Overseas[edit]

In the 2014-15 WNBA off-season, Sims played for Bucheon KEB-Hana Bank in South Korea. In the 2015-16 WNBA off-season, Sims played for Abdullah Gül Üniversitesi B.K. in Turkey. As of August 2016, Sims signed with Botaş SK of the Turkish League for the 2016-17 WNBA off-season.[15] In 2017, Sims signed with Adana ASKİ SK of the Turkish League for the 2017-18 WNBA off-season.[16] In 2018, Sims signed with Kayseri Basketbol of the Turkish League during the 2018-19 WNBA off-season.[17]

USA Basketball[edit]

Sims played on the team representing the US at the 2011 Summer Universiade held in Shenzhen, China. The team, coached by Bill Fennelly, won all six games to earn the gold medal. Sims averaged 6.2 points per game.[18]

Sims was selected to be a member of the team representing the US at the 2013 Summer Universiade held in Kazan, Russia. The team, coached by Sherri Coale, won the opening four games easily, scoring in triple digits in each game, and winning by 30 or more points in each case. After winning the quarterfinal game against Sweden, they faced Australia in the semifinal. The USA team opened up as much as a 17 point in the fourth quarter of the game but the Australian team fought back and took a one-point lead in the final minute. Crystal Bradford scored a basket with 134 seconds left ant he game to secure a 79–78 victory. The gold medal opponent was Russia, but the USA team never trailed, and won 90–71 to win the gold medal and the World University games Championship. Sims was the third leading scorer for the team, averaging 12.7 points per game. She led the team in assists with 32, and steals with 12. She was named co-MVP of the tournament, along with Russia's Tatiana Grigoryeva.[19]

WNBA career statistics[edit]

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game  RPG  Rebounds per game
 APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game  BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game
 TO  Turnovers per game  FG%  Field-goal percentage  3P%  3-point field-goal percentage  FT%  Free-throw percentage
 Bold  Career high League leader

Regular season[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG TO PPG
2014 Tulsa 34 31 34.4 .406 .346 .839 2.8 4.2 1.2 0.2 2.0 16.7
2015 Tulsa 23 19 31.4 .369 .207 .847 3.4 3.8 1.0 0.0 2.7 16.0
2016 Dallas 34 30 31.6 .353 .280 .883 2.5 3.9 1.0 0.2 2.5 14.0
2017 Los Angeles 31 14 24.3 .447 .190 .886 1.9 3.5 1.4 0.1 1.4 9.6
2018 Los Angeles 34 24 25.5 .388 .273 .722 2.5 2.8 0.5 0.0 1.5 8.2
Career 5 years, 2 teams 156 118 29.4 .390 .274 .842 2.6 3.6 1.1 0.1 2.0 12.8

Playoffs[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG TO PPG
2015 Tulsa 2 2 33.6 .336 .333 .786 4.0 5.0 2.0 0.0 2.0 20.0
2017 Los Angeles 8 8 34.8 .442 .346 .929 2.4 3.6 1.3 0.0 3.1 15.9
2018 Los Angeles 2 0 14.4 .375 .500 1.000 2.5 1.5 1.0 0.0 0.0 4.5
Career 3 years, 2 teams 12 10 31.2 .411 .333 .886 2.7 3.5 1.4 0.0 2.4 14.7

Awards and honors[edit]

Odyssey Sims winning Lieberman Award, presented at the 2014 WBCA Award ceremony

References[edit]

  1. ^ "WBB, Notre Dame Battle for NCAA Title - Baylor Bears Official Athletic Site". BaylorBears.com. Retrieved April 6, 2012.
  2. ^ "USA Basketball: Odyssey Sims". Retrieved April 6, 2012.
  3. ^ "Odyssey Sims 2010 High School Girls' Basketball Profile - ESPNHS". Retrieved April 6, 2012.
  4. ^ a b "Odyssey Sims - WNBA.com - Official Site of the WNBA". WNBA.com - Official Site of the WNBA. Retrieved 2017-09-16.
  5. ^ "Women's basketball: Odyssey Sims pours in career-high 48 points as Baylor rolls; UT wins, Tech falls". SportsDay. 2014-01-09. Retrieved 2017-09-16.
  6. ^ "Women's Basketball Player stats". NCAA. Retrieved 25 Sep 2015.
  7. ^ "Shock guard Odyssey Sims named WNBA rookie of the month". tulsaworld.com. Retrieved 2017-10-15.
  8. ^ "Dallas Wings trade former Baylor star Odyssey Sims to Los Angeles Sparks for first-round pick". SportsDay. 2017-02-17. Retrieved 2017-09-16.
  9. ^ "Sparks Acquire Odyssey Sims in Trade with Wings - WNBA.com - Official Site of the WNBA". WNBA.com - Official Site of the WNBA. Retrieved 2017-09-16.
  10. ^ "Odyssey Sims scores 28 as Sparks beat short-handed Mercury". Los Angeles Times. 2017-08-24. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved 2017-09-16.
  11. ^ WNBA News: Sims re-signs with Los Angeles
  12. ^ Chelsea Gray’s shot lifts Sparks past Lynx 77-76 in WNBA finals rematch
  13. ^ Augustus and Quigley re-sign with Minnesota and Chicago
  14. ^ The Lynx are replacing retired legend Lindsay Whalen with her nemesis
  15. ^ "2016-2017 WNBA Overseas Signings - Women's Basketball 24.7". Women's Basketball 24.7. 2016-08-22. Retrieved 2017-09-16.
  16. ^ Odyssey Sims mackolic.com
  17. ^ ODYSSEY SIMS basketball profile
  18. ^ "Twenty-Sixth World University Games -- 2011". USA Basketball. Archived from the original on 7 September 2015. Retrieved 13 October 2015.
  19. ^ "Twenty-Seventh World University Games -- 2013". USA Basketball. Archived from the original on 7 September 2015. Retrieved 13 October 2015.
  20. ^ "Past WBCA HS Coaches' All-America Teams". Women's Basketball Coaches Association. Archived from the original on 2014-07-15. Retrieved 1 Jul 2014.
  21. ^ "Slideshow: espnW All-Americans". ESPN. Retrieved 14 Mar 2014.
  22. ^ "USBWA ANNOUNCES 2013-14". U.S. Basketball Writers Association. March 31, 2014. Retrieved 2 Apr 2014.
  23. ^ "Frances Pomeroy Naismith". Women's Basketball Coaches Association. Archived from the original on 2014-07-15. Retrieved 30 Jun 2014.
  24. ^ "The Wade Trophy". Women's Basketball Coaches Association. Retrieved 30 Jun 2014.
  25. ^ Canizales, Nick. "Odyssey Sims Named Dawn Staley Award Winner". www.kcentv.com. Retrieved 2016-04-09.

External links[edit]