Phi Epsilon Pi

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Phi Epsilon Pi
ΦΕΠ
FoundedNovember 23, 1904; 115 years ago (November 23, 1904)
City College of New York, New York, NY
TypeSocial
ScopeInternational

The Phi Epsilon Pi (ΦΕΠ) fraternity, active between 1904 and 1970 with a predominantly Jewish membership, was founded in New York City and eventually opened at least 48 chapters on college campuses across the United States and one in Canada.

Founding[edit]

The Phi Epsilon Pi (PEP) fraternity was established on November 23, 1904 at the College of the City of New York (CCNY). Phi Epsilon Pi was incorporated in New York State on February 9, 1914 and became a member of the National Interfraternity Conference in 1921. The fraternity was founded on non-sectarian principles, but throughout the organization’s history, the membership was largely Jewish.[1]

The fraternity’s first chapters were founded at the College of the City of New York (Alpha, 1904), Columbia University (Beta, 1905), and Cornell University (Epsilon, 1911).

Expansion[edit]

In 1913, the fraternity started to expand outside of New York State. By 1933, PEP’s total membership stood at 3600. During World War II approximately 2000 fraternity members served in the military, and most chapters closed. After the war, the chapters were reactivated, and new chapters opened as well, including one at McGill University in Canada, making PEP an international fraternity. In 1954, the membership of the fraternity reached 11,132.[2]

Mergers[edit]

In 1932 Sigma Lambda Pi merged into Phi Epsilon Pi. Kappa Nu merged into Phi Epsilon Pi in 1961.[3][4]

In 1970, PEP was absorbed into the Zeta Beta Tau fraternity.

Chapters[edit]

Chapters of Phi Epsilon Phi:[5][6]

(Chapters beginning with Kappa prepended were absorbed in the merger with Kappa Nu)[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ “History and Purpose of Phi Epsilon Pi,” 1925-1941; Phi Epsilon Pi Fraternity Records; I-76; Box 1, Folder 5; American Jewish Historical Society, Boston, MA and New York, NY.
  2. ^ “Pledge Manuals,” 1934-1955; Phi Epsilon Pi Fraternity Records; I-76; Box 47, Folder 5-6; American Jewish Historical Society, Boston, MA and New York, NY.
  3. ^ "Zeta Beta Tau's Antecedent History of Phi Epsilon Pi". Retrieved January 28, 2013.
  4. ^ a b Sanua, Marianne Rachel (2003), Going Greek: Jewish College Fraternities in the United States, 1895–1945, Wayne State University Press, ISBN 0-8143-2857-1
  5. ^ Guide to the Phi Epsilon Pi Fraternity Records, 1912-1969; Phi Epsilon Pi Fraternity Records; I-76; American Jewish Historical Society, Boston, MA and New York, NY.
  6. ^ Our antecedent groups - Phi Epsilon Pi
  7. ^ 1969 Bryant Yearbook

Further reading[edit]

  • Sanua, Marianne R. (Winter 2000). "Jewish College Fraternities in the United States 1895-1968: An Overview". Journal of American Ethnic History. 19 (2): 3–42. JSTOR 27502544.

External links[edit]