Pierre Bussières

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The Hon.

Pierre Bussières
Member of the Canadian Parliament
for Portneuf
In office
1974–1979
Preceded byRoland Godin
Succeeded byRolland Dion
Member of the Canadian Parliament
for Charlesbourg
In office
1979–1984
Preceded byDistrict was created in 1976
Succeeded byMonique Tardif
Personal details
Born (1939-07-08) July 8, 1939 (age 80)
Normandin, Quebec
Political partyLiberal
CabinetMinister of National Revenue (1982-1984)

Pierre Bussières, PC (July 8, 1939 – August 15, 2014) was a Canadian politician.[1]

Bussières was first elected to the House of Commons of Canada in the 1974 federal election as the Member of Parliament (MP) for Portneuf.[1] He was re-elected in the 1979 election, this time from Charlesbourg.[1] He was chairman of the Quebec Liberal caucus while the party was in opposition.

The defeat of the Progressive Conservative government of Prime Minister Joe Clark on a non-confidence motion occurred after Pierre Trudeau had announced his resignation as Liberal Party leader. Bussières quickly announced that the Quebec caucus unanimously supported Trudeau's return as leader, and urged the former prime minister] to rescind his resignation. After the rest of the federal caucus and the party executive followed suit in requesting his return, Trudeau announced that he would lead the Liberals into the 1980 federal election held as a result of the Clark government's fall.

The Liberals were elected with a majority government, and Trudeau appointed Bussières to cabinet as Minister of State for finance. In 1982, he was promoted to Minister of National Revenue.[1]

Bussières was not included in the cabinet of Trudeau's successor, John Turner, which was formed in June 1984. Nevertheless, he was a candidate in the 1984 federal election, but was defeated as the Liberals lost government and were reduced to forty seats in the House of Commons.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Parliamentarian File: BUSSIÈRES, The Hon. Pierre, P.C." Parliament of Canada. Retrieved 1 June 2015.

External links[edit]