Richard Enderlin

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Richard Enderlin
Richard Enderlin 1905 public domain USGov.jpg
Enderlin in 1905
Born(1843-01-11)January 11, 1843
Baden, Germany
DiedFebruary 11, 1930(1930-02-11) (aged 87)
Place of burial
Grandview Cemetery Chillicothe
AllegianceUnited States
Service/branchUnited States Army
Years of service1861–1865
RankMusician
USA SGT INF 1859.jpg
E-05Sergeant
UnitOhio Company B, 73rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry Regiment
Battles/warsAmerican Civil War
*Battle of Gettysburg
AwardsMedal of Honor

Richard Enderlin (January 11, 1843 – February 11, 1930) was a musician and United States Army soldier who received a Medal of Honor for the heroism he displayed when fighting in the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863.

Gettysburg[edit]

Enderlin was born in Germany and grew up in Chillicothe, Ohio. He enlisted in the Army in November 1861. Enderlin thought his unit was not directly engaged, so the bugler voluntarily joined the defense of Cemetery Ridge. On July 2, during combat, George Nixon III (the great-grandfather of American President Richard Nixon) was mortally wounded and was carried out of harm's way by Enderlin. For this action, he was promoted to sergeant the next day, and received the Medal of Honor on September 11, 1897.

Enderlin was later wounded in his right foot at the Battle of Dallas, and served in the Veteran Reserve Corps until his discharge in May 1865.[1]

Enderlin is buried at Grandview Cemetery, Chillicothe, Ross County, Ohio, US.

Medal of Honor citation[edit]

Rank and organization: Musician, Company B, 73d Ohio Infantry. Place and date: At Gettysburg, Pa., 1-July 3, 1863. Entered service at: Chillicothe, Ohio. Birth: Germany. Date of issue: September 11, 1897.

Citation:

The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to Musician Richard Enderlin, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism from 1 to 3 July 1863, while serving with Company B, 73d Ohio Infantry, in action at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. Musician Enderlin voluntarily took a rifle and served as a soldier in the ranks during the first and second days of the battle. Voluntarily and at his own imminent peril went into the enemy's lines at night and, under a sharp fire, rescued a wounded comrade.[2][3][4]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

  • Dyer, Frederick H (1908). A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion. Des Moines, IA: Dyer Pub. Co. ASIN B01BUFJ76Q. OCLC 8697590.
  • Hurst, Samuel H. Journal-History of the Seventy-Third Ohio Volunteer Infantry (Chillicothe, OH: S. H. Hurst), 1866.
  • Ohio Roster Commission (1888). 70th–86th Regiments—Infantry. Official Roster of the Soldiers of the State of Ohio in the War on the Rebellion, 1861–1865. VI. Akron, OH: The Werner Ptg. and Mfg. Co. p. 810. OCLC 181357575.
  • Reid, Whitelaw (1868). The History of Her Regiments, and Other Military Organizations. Ohio in the War: Her Statesmen, Her Generals, and Soldiers. II. Cincinnati, OH: Moore, Wilstach, & Baldwin. p. 1002. ISBN 9781154801965. OCLC 11632330.
  • Subcommittee on Veterans' Affairs, United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Labor and Public Welfare (1968). Edward M Kennedy, Chairman (ed.). Medal of Honor, 1863-1968 : "In the Name of the Congress of the United States". Committee print (United States. Congress), 90th Congress, 2nd session. Washington DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. p. 1087. OCLC 1049691780.
  • U.S. War Department (1880). The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. OCLC 857196196.
  • "Richard Enderlin - Recipient -". The Hall of Valor Project. Sightline Media Group. 2020. Retrieved 19 May 2020.
  • "MOHs - victoriacross". THE COMPREHENSIVE GUIDE TO THE VICTORIA & GEORGE CROSS. VCOnline. 2020. Retrieved 2 May 2020.
  • "ENDERLIN, RICHARD". Congressional Medal of Honor Society. CMOHS. 2014. Retrieved 19 August 2014.
  • "Enderlin, Richard - The National Medal of Honor Museum The National Medal of Honor Museum". The National Medal of Honor Museum. The National Medal of Honor Museum Foundation. 2020. Retrieved 19 May 2020.
  • "Infantry Units: 73rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry". www.bgsu.edu. Center for Archival Collections. 2019. Archived from the original on 2007-06-10. Retrieved 2008-03-20.
  • "Notable Citizens". Retrieved October 5, 2010.
  • "Photo of Gravesite". Retrieved October 5, 2010.
  • "Medal of Honor citation". Retrieved October 5, 2010.
  • "Battles and Campaigns". Archived from the original on September 8, 2008. Retrieved October 5, 2010.

External links[edit]