Süleymaniye Hamam

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Interior view of Süleymaniye Hamam

Suleymaniye Hamam is an historic Turkish bath in İstanbul, Turkey. The building, situated on a hill facing the Golden Horn, was built in 1557 by Turkish architect Mimar Sinan; it was named for Süleyman the Magnificent. It is part of the Suleymaniye mosque complex.

The hamam was commissioned by Sultan Süleyman, ruler of the Ottoman Empire between 1520 and 1566.[1] The building is lavishly arched and domed, with elaborate marble inlay work on the walls. Sulemaniye Hamam is a traditional bathhouse consisting of three sections: cold, lukewarm and hot. Temperatures in the hot section can reach 40-60 degrees Celsius (104-140 F). The hamam is still operating today and caters mainly to tourists.[2] It is the only hamam in Istanbul where men and women bathe together. Male attendants, called tellak, cater to all the clients.[3]

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Coordinates: 41°00′57″N 28°57′57″E / 41.0159°N 28.9658°E / 41.0159; 28.9658