Second Whitlam Ministry

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Second Whitlam Ministry
Flag of Australia.svg
48th Ministry of Australia
Date formed19 December 1972
Date dissolved12 June 1974
People and organisations
MonarchElizabeth II
Governor-GeneralSir Paul Hasluck
Prime MinisterGough Whitlam
Deputy Prime MinisterLance Barnard
No. of ministers27
Member partyLabor
Status in legislatureMajority government
Opposition partyLiberal
Opposition leaderBilly Snedden
History
Outgoing election18 May 1974
Legislature term(s)28th
PredecessorFirst Whitlam Ministry
SuccessorThird Whitlam Ministry

The Second Whitlam Ministry (Labor) was the 48th ministry of the Government of Australia. It was led by the country's 21st Prime Minister, Gough Whitlam. The Second Whitlam Ministry succeeded the First Whitlam Ministry, which dissolved on 19 December 1972 after the final results of the federal election that took place on 2 December became known and the full ministry was able to be sworn in. The ministry was replaced by the Third Whitlam Ministry on 12 June 1974 following the 1974 federal election.[1]

The order of seniority in the Second Whitlam Ministry was determined by the order in which members were elected to the Ministry by the Caucus on 18 December 1972, except for the four parliamentary leaders, who were elected separately.

As of 24 August 2017, Bill Hayden, Doug McClelland and Moss Cass are the last surviving members of the Second Whitlam Ministry.

Ministry[edit]

Minister Portrait Portfolio
  Hon Gough Whitlam QC
(1916–2014)

MP for Werriwa
(1952–1978)

Gough Whitlam - ACF - crop.jpg
  Hon Lance Barnard
(1919–1997)

MP for Bass
(1954–1975)

Lance Barnard 1970 (cropped).jpg
  Hon Dr Jim Cairns
(1914–2003)

MP for Lalor
(1969–1977)

Jim Cairns.jpg
  Hon Bill Hayden
(1933–)

MP for Oxley
(1961–1988)

Bill Hayden 1969.jpg
  Hon Frank Crean
(1916–2008)

MP for Melbourne Ports
(1951–1977)

FrankCrean1967.jpg
  Hon Lionel Murphy QC
(1922–1986)

Senator for New South Wales
(1962–1975)

Lionel Murphy 1973 (cropped).jpg
  Hon Don Willesee
(1916–2003)

Senator for Western Australia
(1950–1975)

Senator Donald Robert Willesee (cropped).jpg
  Hon Doug McClelland
(1926–)

Senator for New South Wales
(1962–1987)

Doug McClelland 1962 (cropped).jpg
  Hon Dr Rex Patterson
(1927–2016)

MP for Dawson
(1966–1975)

Rex Patterson 1966 (cropped).jpg
  Hon Reg Bishop
(1913–1999)

Senator for South Australia
(1962–1981)

RegBishop1963 (cropped).jpg
  Hon Fred Daly
(1912–1995)

MP for Grayndler
(1949–1975)

Fred Daly 1961 (cropped).jpg
  Hon Clyde Cameron
(1913–2008)

MP for Hindmarsh
(1949–1980)

Clyde Cameron 1967 (cropped).jpg
  Hon Tom Uren
(1921–2015)

MP for Reid
(1958–1990)

Tom Uren 1966 (cropped).jpg
  Hon Charles Jones
(1917–2003)

MP for Newcastle
(1958–1983)

Charles Jones 1967 (cropped).jpg
  Hon Kim Beazley
(1917–2007)

MP for Fremantle
(1945–1977)

Kim Beazley 1962 (cropped).jpg
  Hon Frank Stewart
(1923–1979)

MP for Lang
(1953–1977)

Frank Stewart.png
  Hon Jim Cavanagh
(1913–1990)

Senator for South Australia
(1962–1981)

Jim Cavanagh 1960s.png
  Hon Ken Wriedt
(1927–2010)

Senator for Tasmania
(1968–1980)

Ken Wriedt 1960s.png
  Hon Gordon Bryant
(1914–1991)

MP for Wills
(1955–1980)

Gordon Bryant 1969.jpg
  Hon Rex Connor
(1907–1977)

MP for Cunningham
(1963–1977)

Rex Connor 1965 (cropped).jpg
  Hon Al Grassby
(1926–2005)

MP for Riverina
(1969–1974)

No image.svg
  Hon Les Johnson
(1924–2015)

MP for Hughes
(1969–1983)

Les Johnson 1963 (cropped).jpg
  Hon Kep Enderby (QC)
(1926–2015)

MP for Australian Capital Territory
(1970–1974)

MP for Canberra
(1974–1975)

No image.svg
  Hon Lionel Bowen
(1922–2012)

MP for Kingsford-Smith
(1969–1990)

Lionel Bowen.jpg
  Hon Dr Doug Everingham
(1923–2017)

MP for Capricornia
(1967–1975)

Doug Everingham 1968 (cropped).jpg
  Hon Dr Moss Cass
(1927–)

MP for Maribyrnong
(1969–1983)

No image.svg
  Hon Bill Morrison
(1928–2013)

MP for St George
(1969–1975)

No image.svg

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Ministries and Cabinets". Parliamentary Handbook. Parliament of Australia. Retrieved 17 September 2010.