Sidon Eyalet revolt (1834)

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Sidon Eyalet Revolt
Part of the Syrian Peasant Revolt (1834–35)
DateMay–July 1834;
1835
Location
Result

Revolt suppressed

  • Some rebel leaders executed
  • Egyptian rule reasserted
  • Conscription orders carried out
Belligerents

Flag of Egypt (1844-1867).svg Egypt Eyalet

  • Urban notables of Safed and Tiberias
  • Madi family of Acre region
  • Hawwara tribe of Galilee

  • Druze of Mount Lebanon
    Commanders and leaders

    Flag of Egypt (1844-1867).svg Muhammad Ali
    Flag of Egypt (1844-1867).svg Ibrahim Pasha

    Chehab Emirate flag.svg Bashir Shihab II

    Mas'ud al-Madi Executed
    Isa al-Madi Executed

    Aqil Agha

    Sidon Eyalet Revolt refers to events in Ottoman Syria during the Syrian Peasant Revolt (1834–35), when in parallel to the Peasant uprising in Palestine and Transjordan (south of the Damascus Eyalet), Galilee-based rebels captured Safad and Tiberias in the eastern Galilee.[1] The Hauran was also encompassed by the rebellion. In 1835, some Druze clans of Mount Lebanon rose in another revolt.

    Timeline[edit]

    In parallel to the Peasant uprising in Palestine and Transjordan (south of the Damascus Eyalet), Galilee-based rebels captured Safad and Tiberias in the eastern Galilee.[1] The Hauran was also encompassed by the rebellion.

    The most severe events took place in Galilee, climaxing with the 1834 looting of Safed which was mostly an attack against the Jewish community of the city, which began on Sunday 15 June 1834, and lasted for the next 33 days.[2][3] The governor of Safed and thirteen of the ringleaders were taken captive, summarily tried, and put to death. The district governor tried to quell the violent outbreak, but failed to do so and fled.[4]

    Upon arrival of Muhammad Ali was in Damascus Eyalet, he requested military assistance from Emir Bashir Shihab II of Mount Lebanon, via an emissary, Emir Shihab's son Amin. The arrival of Bashir's Druze troops followed intervention of foreign consuls. In late July 1834, Emir Bashir led his forces toward Galilee, but before advancing further southward, he made a number of proclamations advising that the rebels of Safad surrender. The rebel leadership in Safad agreed to negotiate and sent Sheikh Salih al-Tarshihi as an emissary to Bashir to arrange a meeting. Bashir invited the leaders of Safad to the village of Bint Jbeil where they agreed to surrender and submit to Egyptian authority. Afterward, Bashir arrived in Safad where he arranged for rebel leaders from nearby areas to surrender as well.[5] Bashir's Druze forces under the command of his son Amin,[6] entered Safad without resistance on 18 July 1834, making way for the displaced residents from its Jewish quarter to return.[7] The instigators were arrested and later executed in Acre.[citation needed]

    In 1835, some Druze clans of Mount Lebanon rose up in another revolt.

    See also[edit]

    References[edit]

    1. ^ a b Rood, 2004, p. 131
    2. ^ Bloch, Abraham P. One a day: an anthology of Jewish historical anniversaries, 1987. pg. 168.
    3. ^ Louis Finkelstein (1960). The Jews: their history, culture, and religion. Harper. p. 679. Retrieved 17 February 2012. Rabbi Isaac b. Solomon Farhi records that the pillage continued for 24 days.
    4. ^ Andrew G. Bostom (2008). The legacy of Islamic antisemitism: from sacred texts to solemn history. Prometheus Books. p. 594.
    5. ^ Safi, Khaled M. (2008), "Territorial Awareness in the 1834 Palestinian Revolt", in Roger Heacock (ed.), Of Times and Spaces in Palestine: The Flows and Resistances of Identity, Beirut: Presses de l'Ifpo, ISBN 9782351592656
    6. ^ Farah 2000, p. 22.
    7. ^ Lieber, Sherman (1992). Mystics and Missionaries: The Jews in Palestine, 1799-1840. University of Utah Press. p. 215. ISBN 9780874803914.