Silesian Parliament

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Silesian Parliament

Sejm Śląski
Legislative body of Silesian Voivodeship (1920–1939)
Coat of arms or logo
Type
Type
History
Established1922
Disbanded1939
Preceded byLegislative Sejm (Second Polish Republic)
Succeeded bySilesian Regional Assembly
Structure
Seats28 (at dissolution)
Silesian Parliament in 1935.svg
Political groups
     Sanation (28)
Elections
Multi-member constituencies
Last election
1935
Meeting place
Katowice - Gmach Województwa Śląskiego.JPG
Silesian Parliament, Katowice

Silesian Parliament or Silesian Sejm (Polish: Sejm Śląski) was the governing body of the Silesian Voivodeship (1920–1939), an autonomous voivodeship of the Second Polish Republic between 1920 and 1945. It was elected in democratic elections and had certain influence over the usage of taxes collected in Silesia. It consisted of 48 deputies (24 from 1935).

History[edit]

The eastern part of Upper Silesia became part of the Second Polish Republic following the Silesian Uprisings throughout the Upper Silesian region between 1918 and 1921, and Upper Silesia Plebiscite. The land was subsequently divided by an allied commission and the League of Nations, leaving Katowice region on the Polish side. Together with Cieszyn Silesia it formed Silesian Voievodeship with significant autonomy (Silesian Parliament as a constituency and Silesian Voivodship Council as the executive body).

Building[edit]

Designed by architect Ludwik Wojtyczko [pl], the Silesian Parliament was built in 1925–1929. For a very long time it was the biggest structure in Poland.[1] Currently it hosts the offices of the Silesian Voivodship. The building has seven floors and contains one of four paternoster lifts currently in use in Poland. The Polish architect Adolf Szysko-Bohusz announced a competition for the design of the new Silesian Parliament in 1925, who wished the building to espouse the local Polish cultural identity of the region, instead of the more customary German/ Prussian style. When the building was inaugurated in May 1929, Michal Grazynski, President of the Province of Upper silesia, called the building a "material symbol of Polish culture and power".[2]

The building is one of Poland's official national Historic Monuments (Pomnik historii), as designated October 22, 2012 and tracked by the National Heritage Board of Poland.

Composition[edit]

1922[edit]

Parliament 1922.svg
Political groups Mandates
Blok Narodowy 18
Polish Socialist Party 8
National Workers' Party 7
Katolische Volkspartei 12 6
Deutsche Partei 6
German Socialists 2
Piast 1
Total 48

1930 (I)[edit]

Silesian Parliament 1930.svg
Political groups Mandates
Katolische Volkspartei 15 10
Deutsche Partei 5
German Socialists 1
Christian democracy 13
Narodowo-Chrześcijańskie Zjednoczenie Pracy 10
Polish Socialist Party 4
National Workers' Party 3
Communists 2
Total 48

1930 (II)[edit]

Second Silesian Parliament 1930.svg
Political groups Mandates
Narodowo-Chrześcijańskie Zjednoczenie Pracy 19
Christian democracy 19
Polish Socialist Party 1
Katolische Volkspartei 7 5
Deutsche Partei 2
German Socialists 2
Total 48

1935[edit]

Silesian Parliament Final.svg
Political groups Mandates
Sanation 24
Total 24

Leadership[edit]

Karol Grzesik

Leadership (1922-29):

  • Marshal of the Sejm: Konstanty Wolny;
  • Deputy Marshal of the Sejm: Józef Biniszkiewicz, Michał Grajek, Eduard Pant, Kazimierz Rakowski, Edward Rybarz.

Leadership (1930):

  • Marshal of the Sejm: Konstanty Wolny;
  • Deputy Marshal of the Sejm: Emil Caspari, Włodzimierz Dąbrowski, Eduard Pant.

Leadership (1930-35):

  • Marshal of the Sejm: Konstanty Wolny;
  • Deputy Marshal of the Sejm: Włodzimierz Dąbrowski, Eduard Pant, Emil Gajdas, Jan Kędzior.

Leadership (1935-39):

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Autonomous Silesia – Katowice". www.inyourpocket.com.
  2. ^ "Search".

Literature[edit]

  • Nowak Jerzy (kier.): Przewodnik po Katowicach, Wydawnictwo „Śląsk”, Katowice 1962, s. 228;
  • Rechowicz Henryk: Sejm Śląski 1922−1939, Wydawnictwo „Śląsk”, Katowice 1971;
  • Sala Sejmu Śląskiego to dla nas ważne miejsce (pol.) www.katowice.naszemiasto.pl [dostęp 2011-05-19];
  • Wojciech Janota: Katowice między wojnami. Miasto i jego sprawy 1922–1939. Łódź: Księży Młyn, 2010, s. 11, 12. ISBN 978-83-7729-021-7.