Talk:Gettysburg Address

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Featured articleGettysburg Address is a featured article; it (or a previous version of it) has been identified as one of the best articles produced by the Wikipedia community. Even so, if you can update or improve it, please do so.
Main Page trophyThis article appeared on Wikipedia's Main Page as Today's featured article on February 12, 2006.
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October 15, 2005Featured article candidateNot promoted
November 18, 2005Peer reviewReviewed
December 19, 2005Peer reviewReviewed
December 27, 2005Featured article candidatePromoted
January 12, 2008Featured article reviewKept
Current status: Featured article

Caption on photo of Lincoln[edit]

It says "One of the two confirmed photos of Abraham Lincoln[1][2][3] (sepia highlight) at Gettysburg, taken about noon, just after he arrived and some three hours before the speech. To Lincoln's right is his bodyguard, Ward Hill Lamon. The current version of the file does not have the sepia highlight. 146.115.21.211 (talk) 02:27, 17 March 2018 (UTC)

And the body of the article says there's only one photo! ApLundell (talk) 06:40, 4 June 2018 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 11 April 2018[edit]

all i want to do is put a "an" before adress it bugs me that it isnt written properly for such a big part of our history Parker beckwith (talk) 17:52, 11 April 2018 (UTC)

Can you specify where in this article you would like that change made? —KuyaBriBriTalk 18:21, 11 April 2018 (UTC)
 Not done: it's not clear what changes you want to be made. Please mention the specific changes in a "change X to Y" format and provide a reliable source if appropriate. DRAGON BOOSTER 07:49, 14 April 2018 (UTC)

Terminology[edit]

As I read the article, it states that responses included "Democrat-leaning" publications and "Republican-leaning" publications, which would surely be confusing and misleading terms to people in the 21st Century, as 19th Century "Democrats" would be right-wing and "Republicans" would be left-wing. I would like to suggest these be changed, but I won't do so without discussion. Thedoctor98 (talk) 09:05, 17 September 2018 (UTC)

Okay, I've waited 6 weeks and nobody has interjected; I'll make the change to left-leaning and right-leaning publications and hopefully discussion can start then. Thedoctor98 (talk) 04:20, 4 November 2018 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 20 September 2018[edit]

In just over two minutes, Lincoln reiterated the principles of human equality that were espoused by the Declaration of Independence[6] and furthermore, proclaimed the Civil War as a struggle for the preservation of the Union sundered by the secession crisis,[7] with "a new birth of freedom"[8] that would bring true equality to all of its citizens.[9] Madiwiernusz (talk) 13:03, 20 September 2018 (UTC)

 Not done: it's not clear what changes you want to be made. Please mention the specific changes in a "change X to Y" format and provide a reliable source if appropriate. —KuyaBriBriTalk 13:26, 20 September 2018 (UTC)

Problematic repetitions in Intro[edit]

The second and third paragraphs of the intro now read:

Lincoln's carefully crafted address, secondary to others' presentations that day, came to be seen as one of the greatest and most influential statements of American national purpose. In just over two minutes, Lincoln reiterated the principles of human equality espoused by the Declaration of Independence [6] and proclaimed the Civil War as a struggle for the preservation of the Union sundered by the secession crisis,[7] with "a new birth of freedom"[8] that would bring true equality to all of its citizens.[9] Lincoln also redefined the Civil War as a struggle not just for the Union, but also for the principle of human equality.[6]
Beginning with the now-iconic phrase "Four score and seven years ago"‍—‌referring to the signing of the Declaration of Independence eighty-seven years earlier‍—‌Lincoln invoked the United States' founding principles as set forth in that document, then reminded his listeners of the peril to those principles posed by the Civil War then in progress. He extolled the sacrifices of those who died at Gettysburg in defense of those principles, and exhorted his listeners to continue the struggle for survival of the nation's representative democracy as a beacon to the world‍—‌urging resolve
that these dead shall not have died in vain — that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

In each of the paragraphs, the DoI,the meaning of the CW, and the "new birth of freedom" are mentioned. Also "In just over two minutes" only makes sense in contrast to Edward Everett's two-hour oration, which is not mentioned; besides, Lincoln only needed two minutes to deliver the address because it was just 271 words long. Lastly, in "secondary to others' presentations that day" it is not clear in what sense Lincoln's address was secondary to others' presentations, and it is not quite correct to say that there were several other "presentations"—setting aside the music, there was a prayer, EE's oration, AL's remarks, and another prayer, and prayers aren't presentations. I propose a consolidation, with clarifications and corrections, like this:

Although not the day's primary speech, Lincoln's carefully crafted address came to be seen as one of the greatest and most influential statements of American national purpose. In just 271 words, beginning with the now-iconic phrase "Four score and seven years ago,"‍ referring to the signing of the Declaration of Independence eighty-seven years earlier‍, Lincoln described ours as a nation "conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal," and represented the Civil War as a test that would decide whether such a nation could endure. He extolled the sacrifices of those who died at Gettysburg in defense of those principles, and exhorted his listeners to resolve
that these dead shall not have died in vain — that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom — and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

I have incorporated the best of the two original paragraphs, which came to 233 words, in a single paragraph that comes to 151. Wordwright (talk) 18:21, 28 September 2018 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 27 July 2019[edit]

Please change "would determinevwhether such a nation" to "would determine whether such a nation" because there is typo after "determine" and before "whether" where the "v" should be replaced by a space. Julianfortunas (talk) 10:03, 27 July 2019 (UTC)

Julianfortunas Fixed. Thank you.--Chewings72 (talk) 10:12, 27 July 2019 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 13 December 2019[edit]

there are 272 words in the Gettysburg address 71.224.127.7 (talk) 17:00, 13 December 2019 (UTC)

 Not done: it's not clear what changes you want to be made. Please mention the specific changes in a "change X to Y" format and provide a reliable source if appropriate. MadGuy7023 (talk) 17:55, 13 December 2019 (UTC)