United States House of Representatives elections in Kentucky, 2016

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United States House of Representatives elections in Kentucky, 2016

← 2014 November 8, 2016 (2016-11-08)

All six Kentucky seats to the United States House of Representatives

  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Republican Democratic
Last election 5 1
Seats won 5 1
Seat change Steady Steady
Popular vote 1,248,140 516,904
Percentage 70.70% 29.28%

The 2016 United States House of Representatives elections in Kentucky were held on November 8, 2016, to elect the six U.S. Representatives from the state of Kentucky, one from each of the state's six congressional districts. The elections coincided with the 2016 U.S. presidential election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections. The primaries were held on May 17.

District 1[edit]

Republican Ed Whitfield, who had served 11 terms, did not run for re-election for a 12th term.[1] Republicans James Comer, the Agriculture Commissioner of Kentucky,[2] and Michael Pape, Witfield's district director,[3] ran for the Republican Party nomination. Other potential Republican candidates included former Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky nominee Robbie Rudolph, businessman Todd P'Pool, George W. Bush administration official J. Scott Jennings, and Whitfield's chief of staff Cory Hicks.[4] State Senator Max Wise also was considered a potential candidate, but he endorsed Comer.[5] In the May 17th primary, Comer won with 61% of the vote and went on to face Democrat Sam Gaskins in the general election.

Special election[edit]

Whitfield resigned on September 6, 2016. A special election was held on November 8, concurrently with the regularly-scheduled election.[6]

Candidates[edit]

Republican[edit]
Declared
Democratic[edit]
Declared

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
Declined

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[14]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican James Comer 24,342 60.59
Republican Mike Pape 9,357 23.29
Republican Jason Batts 5,578 13.88
Republican Miles A. Caughey, Jr. 896 2.23
Total votes 40,173 100

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
Withdrew
  • Tom Osborne, attorney[15]
Declined

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Kentucky's 1st Congressional District, 2016[21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican James Comer 216,959 72.56
Democratic Sam Gaskins 81,710 27.33
Write-In Terry McIntosh 332 0.11
Total votes 299,001 100
Republican hold

District 2[edit]

Republican Brett Guthrie had represented the district since being elected in 2008 and filed to run for re-election.[8]

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Kentucky's 2nd Congressional District, 2016[21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Brett Guthrie (Incumbent) 251,825 100.00
Total votes 251,825 100
Republican hold

District 3[edit]

Democrat John Yarmuth had represented the district since being elected in 2006 and filed to run for re-election.[8][22]

Republican primary[edit]

Republicans Harold Bratcher, Everett Corley and Robert DeVore Jr. competed in the May primary for the chance to challenge Yarmuth.[8]

Candidates[edit]

  • Harold Bratcher
  • Everett Corley
  • Robert DeVore Jr.

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[14]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Harold Bratcher 9,578 44.53
Republican Everett Corley 7,857 36.53
Republican Robert DeVore, Jr. 4,075 18.94
Total votes 21,510 100

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Kentucky's 3rd Congressional District, 2016[21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Yarmuth (Incumbent) 212,401 63.50
Republican Harold Bratcher 122,093 36.50
Total votes 334,494 100
Democratic hold

District 4[edit]

Republican Thomas Massie had represented the district since being elected in 2012 and filed to run for re-election.[8] Calvin Sidle, who formerly ran for Pikeville City Commissioner, ran for the Democratic nomination.[23][24]

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Kentucky's 4th Congressional District, 2016[21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Thomas Massie (Incumbent) 233,922 71.32
Democratic Calvin Sidle 94,065 28.68
Total votes 327,987 100
Republican hold

District 5[edit]

Republican Hal Rogers had represented the district since being elected in 1980 and filed to run for re-election. He was be challenged by Republican John Burk Jr.[8]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

  • Hal Rogers, Incumbent Congressman
  • John Burk, Jr.

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[14]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Hal Rogers (Incumbent) 35,984 82.43
Republican John Burk, Jr. 7,669 17.57
Total votes 43,653 100

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Kentucky's 5th Congressional District, 2016[21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Hal Rogers (Incumbent) 221,242 100
Total votes 221,242 100
Republican hold

District 6[edit]

Republican Andy Barr had represented the district since being elected in 2012 and filed to run for re-election. He was challenged in the May primary by Roger Brill.[8]

Matt Jones, host and founder of Kentucky Sports Radio, considered challenging Representative Barr, but announced on November 23, 2015 that he would not do so.[25] Rev. Nancy Jo Kemper, a graduate of Yale Divinity School and former Executive Director of the Kentucky Council of Churches, announced she would run for the Democratic nomination on January 21, 2016. She had the support of former Lt. Governor Crit Luallen, State Senator Reggie Thomas, State Representative Susan Westrom, and Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes.[26][27] Geoff Young, candidate for governor in Kentucky in 2014, and Michael Coblenz, a candidate for Kentucky state house in 2010 competed with Kemper for the chance to challenge Barr in the general election.[8] Michael Coblenz later withdrew, leaving Rev. Kemper and Young as the only Democratic candidates.[28]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

  • Andy Barr, Incumbent Congressman
  • Roger Brill

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[14]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Andy Barr (Incumbent) 25,212 84.55
Republican Roger Brill 4,608 15.45
Total votes 29,820 100

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

  • Nancy Jo Kemper
  • Geoffrey "Geoff" M. Young

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[14]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Nancy Jo Kemper 63,440 80.09
Democratic Geoffrey M. Young 15,772 19.91
Total votes 79,212 100

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Kentucky's 6th Congressional District, 2016[21]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Andy Barr (Incumbent) 202,099 61.09
Democratic Nancy Jo Kemper 128,728 38.91
Total votes 330,827 100
Republican hold

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Rep. Ed Whitfield will not seek re-election". The Courier-Journal. September 29, 2015. Retrieved September 30, 2015. 
  2. ^ "Comer runs to replace Whitfield in Kentucky's 1st District". Lexington Herald Leader. Frankfort, Kentucky. September 30, 2015. Retrieved September 30, 2015. 
  3. ^ John Null, Rob Canning. "Rep. Ed Whitfield Isn't Running in 2016, But His District Director Is". wkms.org. Retrieved September 30, 2015. 
  4. ^ a b Yokley, Eli (September 30, 2015). "Two Republicans Launch Campaigns After Whitfield Retirement". Roll Call. Retrieved September 30, 2015. 
  5. ^ a b Wise, Max (September 30, 2015). "Excited for my friend @KYComer in his announcement to run for the 1st Congressional District. Proud to endorse #comerforcongress". Twitter. Retrieved October 2, 2015. 
  6. ^ a b c Callais, Krystle (September 6, 2016). "U.S. Congressman Ed Whitfield stepping down". WPSD-TV. Retrieved September 8, 2016. 
  7. ^ a b Beam, Adam (September 30, 2015). "Comer runs to replace Whitfield in Kentucky's 1st District". Lexington Herald-Leader. Retrieved September 30, 2015. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Candidate Filings with the Office of the Secretary of State". Secretary of State of Kentucky. Archived from the original on November 22, 2015. Retrieved December 4, 2015. 
  9. ^ a b Hancock, Brian (July 16, 2015). "Gaskins discusses platform in Franklin visit". Franklin Favorite. Retrieved October 2, 2015. 
  10. ^ a b "Christian County Native to Run for Congress". WKDZ-FM. October 2, 2015. Retrieved October 6, 2015. 
  11. ^ "Hickman County Attorney to Run For Congress". West Kentucky Star. October 2, 2015. Retrieved October 2, 2015. 
  12. ^ a b c d e Yokley, Eli (September 29, 2015). "Kentucky's Whitfield Won't Seek 12th Term in Congress". Roll Call. Retrieved September 30, 2015. 
  13. ^ P'Pool, Todd (October 1, 2015). "@ToddPPool: Friends, I will not be running for Congress in KY CD 1. I am humbled by the kind support. Shannon and I are excited for @KYGOP! #WeAreKY". Twitter. Retrieved October 21, 2015. 
  14. ^ a b c d e "Official Results" (PDF). Kentucky Secretary of State. Retrieved December 12, 2016. 
  15. ^ "Osborne withdraws from Kentucky House District 1 race". WPSD Local 6. Retrieved April 20, 2016. 
  16. ^ a b c d Gerth, Joseph (October 2, 2015). "Both parties line up to replace Ed Whitfield". The Courier-Journal. Retrieved October 2, 2015. 
  17. ^ Gerth, Joseph (December 10, 2015). "Bevin depletes House Dems with appointment". The Courier-Journal. Retrieved December 14, 2015. 
  18. ^ a b Null, John (October 6, 2015). "State Sen. Dorsey Ridley Likely Joining Race for 1st Congressional District". WKMS-FM. Retrieved October 21, 2015. 
  19. ^ Null, John (December 16, 2015). "State Senator Dorsey Ridley Will Not Join 1st District Congressional Race". WKMS. Retrieved January 9, 2016. 
  20. ^ "State Rep. Gerald Watkins Won't Run for 1st District Congressional Seat". WKMS. October 28, 2015. Retrieved October 29, 2015. 
  21. ^ a b c d e f "Official Results" (PDF). Kentucky Secretary of State. Retrieved December 12, 2016. 
  22. ^ Wheatley, Kevin (June 22, 2015). "Yarmuth announces he will seek re-election to Congress for sixth term". cn2 Pure Politics. Retrieved June 22, 2015. 
  23. ^ "About Calvin Sidle". Calvin Sidle for Congress. January 21, 2016. Retrieved January 21, 2016. 
  24. ^ "Kentucky Secretary of State Election Candidate Filings- Calvin Sidle". Kentucky Secretary of State. January 21, 2016. Retrieved January 21, 2016. 
  25. ^ Storm, Nick (November 23, 2015). "Matt Jones will not run for Congress". CN2 Pure Politics. Retrieved December 14, 2015. 
  26. ^ Youngman, Sam (January 21, 2016). "Democrat Nancy Jo Kemper files to run for U.S. Rep. Andy Barr's seat". Lexington Herald Leader. Retrieved January 21, 2016. 
  27. ^ "Nancy Jo Kemper for Congress". Kemper for Congress. January 21, 2016. Retrieved January 21, 2016. 
  28. ^ "Candidate forum scheduled for Sixth Congressional District primary race for April 3". Kentucky Forward. April 1, 2016. Retrieved April 20, 2016. 

External links[edit]