United States House of Representatives elections in Mississippi, 2016

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United States House of Representatives elections in Mississippi, 2016

← 2014 November 8, 2016 (2016-11-08) 2018 →

Mississippi's four seats in the United States House of Representatives

  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Republican Democratic
Last election 3 1
Seats won 3 1
Seat change Steady Steady
Popular vote 680,810 449,896
Percentage 57.58% 38.05%

The 2016 United States House of Representatives elections in Mississippi were held on November 8, 2016, to elect the four U.S. Representatives from the state of Mississippi, one from each of the state's four congressional districts. The elections coincided with the 2016 U.S. presidential election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections. The primaries were held on March 8.

District 1[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Trent Kelly, who had represented the district since 2015. He won a special election to replace Alan Nunnelee with 70% of the vote in 2015 and the district has a PVI of R+16.

Republican Party[edit]

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Trent Kelly 95,049 89.29
Republican Paul Clever 11,397 10.71
Total votes 106,446 100

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Mississippi's 1st congressional district election, 2016 [2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Trent Kelly (Incumbent) 206,455 68.72
Democratic Jacob Owens 83,947 27.94
Libertarian Chase Wilson 6,181 2.06
Reform Cathy Toole 3,840 1.28
Total votes 300,123 100
Republican hold

District 2[edit]

The incumbent is Democrat Bennie Thompson, who had represented the district since 1993. He won re-election with 68% of the vote in 2014 and the district has a PVI of D+13.

Primary Results[edit]

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John Boule II 35,871 100
Total votes 35,871 100

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Mississippi's 2nd congressional district election, 2016 [2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Bennie G. Thompson (Incumbent) 192,343 67.11
Republican John Boule II 83,542 29.15
Independent Troy Ray 6,918 2.14
Reform Johnny McLeod 3,823 1.33
Total votes 286,626 100
Democratic hold

District 3[edit]

The incumbent is Republican Gregg Harper, who had represented the district since 2009. He won re-election with 69% of the vote in 2014 and the district has a PVI of R+14.

Republican Party[edit]

Primary Results[edit]

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Gregg Harper 87,997 89.10
Republican Jimmy Giles 10,760 10.89
Total votes 98,757 100

Democratic Party[edit]

  • Dennis C. Quinn
  • Nathan Stewart

Primary Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Dennis C. Quinn 29,149 65.45
Democratic Nathan Stewart 15,384 34.55
Total votes 44,533 100

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Mississippi's 3rd congressional district election, 2016 [2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Gregg Harper (Incumbent) 209,490 66.20
Democratic Dennis C. Quinn 96,101 30.37
Veterans Roger Gerrard 8,696 2.75
Reform Lajena Sheets 2,158 0.68
Total votes 316,445 100
Republican hold

District 4[edit]

The incumbent was Republican Steven Palazzo, who had represented the district since 2011. He was re-elected with 70% of the vote in 2014 and the district had a PVI of R+21.

Primary Results[edit]

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Steven Palazzo 103,558 100
Total votes 103,558 100

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Mississippi's 4th congressional district election, 2016 [2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Steven Palazzo (Incumbent) 181,323 65.04
Democratic Mark Gladney 77,505 27.80
Libertarian Richard Blake McCluskey 14,687 5.27
Reform Shawn O'Hara 5,264 1.89
Total votes 278,779 100
Republican hold

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Mississippi Election Results". Mississippi Secretary of State. Retrieved March 23, 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c d "Mississippi General Election 2016". Mississippi Secretary of State. November 8, 2016. Retrieved December 9, 2016. 

External links[edit]