WKRZ

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WKRZ
WKRZ985.PNG
CityFreeland, Pennsylvania
Broadcast areaWilkes-Barre-Scranton
Branding98.5 KRZ
SloganToday's Best Music
Frequency98.5 MHz (also on HD Radio)
First air date1948 (1948) (as WBRE-FM)
FormatAnalog/HD1: CHR
HD2: Country ("Froggy 101")
Language(s)English
ERP8,700 watts (analog)
348 watts (digital)[1]
HAAT357 meters (1,171 ft)
ClassB
Facility ID34379
Transmitter coordinates41°11′56.0″N 75°49′6.0″W / 41.198889°N 75.818333°W / 41.198889; -75.818333 (NAD27)
Callsign meaningWe're KRaZy!
Former callsignsWBRE-FM (1948–1980)
OwnerEntercom Communications
(Entercom License, LLC)
Sister stationsWBZU, WGGY, WILK, WILK-FM, WKZN, WMQX
WebcastListen Live
Websitewww.985krz.com

WKRZ (98.5 FM, "98.5 KRZ") is a commercial FM radio station licensed to serve Freeland, Pennsylvania. The station is owned by Entercom Communications, through licensee Entercom Wilkes-Barre Scranton, LLC, and broadcasts a contemporary hit radio format. Its broadcast tower is located southeast of Wilkes-Barre in Bear Creek Township at (41°11′56.0″N 75°49′5.0″W / 41.198889°N 75.818056°W / 41.198889; -75.818056).[2]

WKRZ uses HD Radio, and simulcasts Froggy 101 WGGY on its HD2 subchannel.

History[edit]

The station first signed on in 1948[3] with the WBRE-FM call sign, licensed to serve Wilkes-Barre. It was the FM sister station to then WBRE AM at 1340 kHz[4] also licensed to serve Wilkes-Barre. WBRE-FM evolved through a number of radio formats and by the 1970s was all-news.[5] The station, up to that point, broadcast in FM mono since its start in 1948. Due to consistently low audience ratings in the area,[6] WBRE-FM made a big change in 1980 when it was sold with the new owners adding FM stereo, a format switch to Top 40/CHR music, along with the call sign change to the present WKRZ. WKRZ has been broadcasting a Top 40/CHR format since 1980, branded at first as "The New 98 & A ½ FM KRZ".

The present owners of WKRZ, Entercom Communications, received FCC approval in 2003 to move WAMT (103.1 MHz FM, now WILK-FM) from Freeland to Avoca. As a condition of the move, Entercom was required to change the city of license of WKRZ from Wilkes-Barre to Freeland due to FCC concerns about the "loss of local service" to Freeland because of the WAMT move. In practice, the only change was the legal ID.[7]

Stations[edit]

One full-power station is licensed to simulcast the programming of WKRZ:

Call sign Frequency City of license Facility ID ERP
W
Height
m (ft)
Class Transmitter coordinates Service contour
WKRF 107.9 FM Tobyhanna, Pennsylvania 14643 830 267.7 meters (878 ft) A 41°02′39.30″N 75°22′39.10″W / 41.0442500°N 75.3775278°W / 41.0442500; -75.3775278 (WKRF) (NAD27) Covers Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania

This station was originally assigned the WPMR call sign on November 29, 1989. The call sign was changed to WPMR-FM on March 11, 1992[8] and was off the air but began a simulcast of WKRZ in 1995.[9] Its call sign was changed to WKRF on May 15, 1995.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "FCC 335-FM Digital Notification [WKRZ]". fcc.gov. Federal Communications Commission. April 9, 2014. Retrieved 2017-01-03.
  2. ^ "FM Query Results for WKRZ". fcc.gov. Federal Communications Commission. Retrieved 2017-01-03.
  3. ^ "U. S. FM Stations as of 1948". Archived from the original on 2004-07-29. Retrieved 2004-07-29.
  4. ^ "U. S. AM stations as of 1946". Archived from the original on 1999-01-28. Retrieved 1999-01-28. Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  5. ^ Northeastern Pennsylvania Radio Answers
  6. ^ "ROCKING LOCAL AIRWAVES MORE THAN 20 YEARS AGO, A TEAM OF WACKY RADIO PERSONALITIES LED WKRZ-FM TO BECOME THE AREA'S MOST SUCCESSFUL FM STATION". Times Leader. Wilkes-Barre, PA. April 8, 2001. p. 1B. Retrieved 2017-03-06.closed access
  7. ^ "NorthEast Radio Watch by Scott Fybush". Archived from the original on 2003-12-09. Retrieved 2003-12-09.
  8. ^ a b "Call Sign History [WKRZ]". fcc.gov. Federal Communications Commission. Retrieved 2017-01-03.
  9. ^ Stark, Phyllis (April 29, 1995). "Vox Jox". Billboard. 107 (17): 92.

External links[edit]